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William Smith Papers
1690-1871 (bulk 1748-1804)

UPT 50 S664

2.0 Cubic feet
Prepared by J. M. Duffin, Mark F. Lloyd, Theresa R. Snyder
January 2001

Access to collections is granted in accordance with the Protocols for the University Archives and Records Center.

 

Facsimiles of ALL documents in this collection can be viewed here.

 

PROVENANCE

Purchased by the University of Pennsylvania in 1992 (accession number 1992:57). 

On 16 June 1992, in New York City, Sotheby's offered at auction nine lots of letters and documents, which its catalog described collectively as the "William Smith Papers." Lots 175, 176, and 177 each consisted of a single autograph letter of Benjamin Franklin to William Smith; Lot 178 consisted of a single Franklin autograph manuscript, which he had titled "Loose Thoughts on a universal Fluid;" Lot 179 consisted of a single autograph letter of Thomas Jefferson to William Smith; Lot 180 consisted of approximately 70 autograph letters of Thomas Penn and other members of the Penn family to Smith; Lot 181 consisted of two autograph letters of Benjamin Rush to Smith; Lot 182 consisted of a 300-page volume of twelve manuscript workbooks and other miscellaneous materials; Lot 183 consisted of approximately 200 letters, documents, and printed materials by or relating to Smith at the College of Philadelphia. Sotheby's did not identify the owner of the Smith collection, as that person (or persons) wished to remain anonymous. The University of Pennsylvania purchased Lots 180, 181, 182, and 183. Upon delivery from Sotheby's, it was found that the four lots contained a total of 323 items. Taken together they constitute the William Smith Papers collection at the University Archives and Records Center. 

An effort to establish the provenance of the collection proved largely successful. Lawrence Henry Gipson, of Lehigh University, in his "Foreword" to Albert Frank Gegenheimer's 1943 biography, titled William Smith: Educator and Churchman, 1727-1803, had thanked Judge Jasper Yeates Brinton, a fifth-generation member of the Smith family, for making available to Gegenheimer "the great collection of Smith papers." Gipson noted that the Brinton Collection of Smith Papers were housed for a few years in the Lehigh University Library, but by 1943 had been transferred to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, where Brinton had placed them on deposit. In his bibliography, Gegenheimer also thanked Judge Brinton, saying that the Brinton Collection was "the most outstanding group of manuscripts" available to the scholar. 

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, scholars of eighteenth century American history enjoyed access to the Brinton collection of the William Smith Papers for more than thirty years. For some, the Smith papers proved essential to the success of their research. In 1968, William Riess Peters completed a doctoral dissertation which he titled "The Contribution of William Smith, 1727-1803, to the Development of Higher Education in the United States." In the bibliography Dr. Peters wrote: 

The most important collection of material for this study was, of course, the Jasper Yeates Brinton Collection of Smith's private papers, which is on deposit at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. This comprises about a wheelbarrow load of papers and boxes, loosely divided into six 'volumes.' Since Judge Brinton first took them with him to Alexandria, Egypt, more than one relative or friend apparently has been involved in an independent attempt to number and classify the documents within some of the volumes, making it sometimes confusing to rely on identification by volume-number citation. The collection was gathered by William Smith himself, and it is lent a special quality by his own short commenting notes on some of the materials. It was brought to the Society for a sort of temporary state of deposit in the early 1940s. 

 

An inquiry at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania found that the Society had microfilmed the Brinton collection in 1969.[1] The University Archives immediately purchased a copy of the two-reel set. A review of the microfilm showed that the Smith collection purchased in 1992 was virtually identical with the Brinton's William Smith Papers collection microfilmed in 1969. Only ten items had been separated from the bulk and sold separately (see Appendix A for an inventory). 

The microfilm also showed, however, that by 1969, Judge Brinton had withdrawn volume four of the six-volume collection. It was known that the Winter 1960 issue (Vol. 26, No. 1) of The Library Chronicle of the University of Pennsylvania Libraries contained a brief article on the Libraries' Provost William Smith collection and the recent gift by Judge Brinton of four manuscript lectures delivered by Smith at Penn in 1767, 1768, and 1769. An announcement appeared in the Spring 1960 issue (26: 2) describing Brinton's gift of thirteen additional manuscript and printed items. It was also known that in 1964 the University Libraries had published in facsimile "The Collection Books of Provost Smith." The first of these was titled "Original Subscription List to The College, Academy, etc., 1772." Its pages were numbered 1 through 11. The second was titled "Collection in England, [1762]." Its pages were numbered 12 through 49. These two books were among those donated in 1960. Their sequential pagination suggested that they were the first two items in a larger group or scrapbook-style volume of manuscripts. This was also the same method of pagination found in the volumes purchased from Sotheby's. An examination of the pages of the two published works revealed the same handwriting as that used to paginate the other volumes of the Brinton Collection. 

An inquiry at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts of the University of Pennsylvania, found that the Smith Collection there included a binding, the spine of which was labeled Volume 4: "College, Academy and Charity School, University of Pennsylvania." The consecutive pagination of the collection books of 1772 and 1762 was continued through six additional items, numbered from page 50 to page 157 (see Appendix B for an inventory). These eight items undoubtedly formed at least a portion of and perhaps all of volume four. It seems clear that Jasper Yeates Brinton withdrew volume four from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and donated it to the University of Pennsylvania in 1959 or early 1960. 

The University's 1964 facsimile publication of The Collection Books of Provost Smith included a 24-page introductory pamphlet written by Brinton and Westlake. At pages 22-24, Brinton's "Note on Provenance" was published. He stated that the papers had passed first from Provost Smith to his son, Judge Charles Smith, and then from Judge Smith to his daughter, Mary Margaret Smith, who married George Brinton. Mary Margaret (Smith) Brinton passed the collection to her son, John Hill Brinton, M.D., who organized the papers and arranged them in six volumes. From John Hill Brinton, they passed to his son, Jasper Yeates Brinton. In the early 1920s, when Jasper Yeates Brinton was appointed to a government post in Alexandria, Egypt, he took the collection with him. Twenty years later, however, when he was asked to make the papers available to historians, he sent them back to the United States. 

Jasper Yeates Brinton died in 1973, leaving as his survivors his widow, Geneva A. (Febiger) Brinton and two children from his first marriage, John (b. 1913 or 1914) and Florence Pamela (b. 1916 or 1917), two grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Within a few years, his heirs withdrew Brinton's William Smith Papers from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. It is not known if it was they or a subsequent owner who was the anonymous seller at the 1992 Sotheby's auction. 

It should also be noted that the children or grandchildren of William Smith apparently divided his papers, either at his death or in the first decades of the 19th century. A collection of Smith papers quite distinct from the Brinton Collection provided the most of the source material for Horace Wemyss Smith's two volume work, Life and Correspondence of the Rev. William Smith, D.D., 2 vols. (Philadelphia: Ferguson Bros and Co., 1880). Horace Smith, like John Hill Brinton, was a great-grandson of William Smith. 

Appendixes 12 through 15 (pp. 541-81) of the second volume of Life and Correspondence contain a five-generation genealogy of the William and Rebecca (Moore) Smith family and biographies of three of their sons. A brief account of the nineteenth century descendants of the Provost has been prepared in order to facilitate a clear understanding of the provenance of the distinct collections of Smith papers (see Appendix C) 

Endnotes 

[1] This should not be confused the "Jasper Yeates Brinton Collection" which was donated in 1951 to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and also contains a series of William Smith papers. 

 

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ARRANGEMENT

The collection is organized by the original volume and page number assigned by John H. Brinton. It is arranged into general groupings alphabetical by name of correspondent and then chronological. The general groupings are as follows: libel suit, 1690-1760 (vol. 1, pp. 1-40); diplomas and certificates, 1753-1759 (vol. 1., pp. 51-57); newspapers and clippings, 1775-1799 (vol. 1, pp. 60-79); Penn family correspondence, 1753-1791 (vol. 2, pp. 1-73); Richard Peters correspondence, 1762-1765 (vol. 2, pp. 77-167); Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson correspondence, 1772-1795 (vol. 3, pp. 1-37); correspondence with famous people, 1789-1802 (vol. 3, pp. 41-55); family correspondence, 1759-1836 (vol. 3, pp. 57-123); writings, 1765-1804 (vol. 5); poems, speeches, notebooks, 1748-1775 (vol. 6). 

 

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BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

William Smith was born in 1727 in Aberdeen, Scotland, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Duncan) Smith. With the support of the Society for the Education of Parochial Schoolmasters, he attended the University of Aberdeen and graduated from there in 1747 with an A. M. degree. After a working in London for a number of charitable religious institutions, Smith chose to come to America in 1751 to serve as the tutor of the sons of Colonel Martin of Long Island, New York. Smith had a keen interest in promoting education in the British North American colonies, and in 1753, he published a pamphlet for the New York Assembly outlining his proposals for a new college in the colony. After reading Smith's proposal, Benjamin Franklin invited Smith to come to Philadelphia to see the new academy and charity school he helped establish several years before. Smith was greatly impressed by his visit to Philadelphia in 1753 and agreed to join the faculty of the school the following year. Before coming to the Academy of Philadelphia, Smith chose to return to England and take Holy Orders in the Church of England. 

In May of 1754, William Smith began his career with the Academy of Philadelphia as a teacher of logic, rhetoric, and natural and moral philosophy. His talents and zeal soon propelled him to the leadership of the institution. When the trustees received a new charter in 1755 which turned the Academy into a degree-granting college, Smith was chosen as its new head, under the title of Provost. He continued to hold this position until the school's charter was revoked in 1779. Smith was an active leader and promoter for the new college. From 1762 to 1763, Smith, along with James Jay of New York, went on an extensive and very successful fund-raising tour of Great Britain which secured several thousand pounds for both the College of Philadelphia and Kings College, New York (later to become Columbia University). 

Smith's educational interests were not confined to the College of Philadelphia. In 1754 he lead the Society for the Propagating Christian Knowledge Among the Germans Settled in Pennsylvania, commonly known as the German Free School movement. Like many Englishmen in Pennsylvania at the time, he feared that the large German-speaking population in Pennsylvania, which was becoming political active, was in danger of succumbing to bad influences due to their ignorance of the English language and government. 

William Smith's activities to promote and support the College of Philadelphia drew him into the fray of Pennsylvania politics. Smith was an astute observer of the political situation and quickly realized that in order to receive the kind of financial support he needed for the College he needed to ally himself to the Penn family, the Proprietors of Pennsylvania. This immediately identified him as an enemy of the provincial assembly, and of Benjamin Franklin, who had been struggling with the Penns over the control of the colony. Smith became a loyal and reliable ally of the Penns, supplying them with detailed information about the state of politics in their colony and identifying their true allies. In 1757 Smith found himself the focus of the ire of the Assembly when he assisted his future father-in-law, William Moore with the publication of a defamatory tract against the Assembly. The following year the Assembly arrested Smith and Moore and placed them in prison for publishing seditious libel. After four months of confinement, Smith was released and eventually exonerated by the Privy Council in London. Smith's politics were not stifled by this experience; he continued to work for the efforts of the Penn family. Smith's activities, however, made him, and the College of Philadelphia by extension, the focus of the many attacks upon proprietary privilege in Pennsylvania. By the time of the American Revolution, Smith managed to alienate himself from the mainstream of Pennsylvania politics and had to seek refuge in Maryland when the Pennsylvania Assembly revoked the charter of the College of Philadelphia and replaced it with the University of the State of Pennsylvania. 

Though much of his time was devoted to the College of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania politics, William Smith was active in the Anglican Church in America. He served as the rector of Trinity Church, Oxford, Philadelphia County from 1766 to 1777. He maintained close connections with the leadership of the Anglican Church in London, particularly the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign parts. Smith also participated in many of the church conventions in America before and after the Revolution. Though he had strived to become a bishop in the new Protestant Episcopal Church of America, his former enemies succeeded in the General Convention by refusing to accept his election as bishop by the Maryland Convention in 1783. 

William Smith returned from Maryland (after helping to establish Washington College) to Philadelphia in his final years. When the conservatives gained control of the state government in the late 1780s, they re-instituted the College of Philadelphia in 1789 and Smith was called back to head the school. This measure, however, failed when it became apparent that Philadelphia was unable to support two colleges. In 1791 the College of Philadelphia was merged with the University of the State of Pennsylvania and became the University of Pennsylvania. As part of the compromise to create the new school, Smith was denied the new provost position in favor of John Ewing. Shut out of the school he fostered for many years, Smith chose to retire to his country mansion at the Falls of the Schuylkill in Philadelphia and occupy the remainder of his life in land speculation and supporting the development of canals in Pennsylvania. He died in 1803 in Philadelphia. 

William Smith married Rebecca Moore (1733-1793) in 1758 and had eight children: William Moore Smith (1759-1821), Thomas Duncan Smith (1760-1821), Williamina Elizabeth Smith (1762-1790) who married Charles Goldsborough of Horn's Point, Maryland, Charles Smith (1765-1836) who married Mary Yeates, Phineas Smith (1767-1770), Richard Smith (1769-1823), Rebecca Smith (1772-1837) who married Samuel Blodget, Jr., and Elizabeth Smith (1776-1778). 

 

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SCOPE AND CONTENT

The William Smith Papers primarily document the public and political activities of William Smith from 1753 to 1775. 

William Smith's staunch support and advocacy of the Penn family, the Proprietors of colonial Pennsylvania, is well documented in the collection. There is extensive correspondence between William Smith and Thomas Penn for the years 1754 to 1770 which provides detailed reports of, and observations on, the state of the Proprietor's political interest in Pennsylvania. After Penn's death in 1775, Smith continued to correspond with his widow Julianna. In addition to the Penn correspondence, the collection contains the legal briefs, petitions, and supporting legal documents used to defendant Smith from the libel suit brought by the Pennsylvania Assembly for his critique of the legislature. 

Documentation regarding Smith's political activities and views after the Revolution can also be found in the collection. These are primarily in the form of reports and letters published in Philadelphia newspaper during the 1780s and 1790s. 

The role of William Smith as an educator and fundraiser loom large in the collection particularly in his correspondence with Richard Peters, the head of the board of the trustees of the College of Philadelphia. The Peters correspondence covers the period 1762 to 1764, during which Smith conducted his extensive tour of Great Britain raising money for the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania). The fund raising trip is also documented in diary covering the months of November and December 1762. In addition to the correspondence with Thomas Penn, William Smith's work as Provost of the College of Philadelphia is found in four notebooks of the commencement exercises of 1765 to 1768. Smith's interest in education, in general, is documented in the bound book of minutes and correspondence of the German Free School movement conducted in Pennsylvania from 1754 to 1756. 

The collection also contains a small number of letters between various members of William Smith's family. The largest of these are between of his wife, Rebecca Moore Smith, and Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson. Some very personal reflections on the passing of William Smith's wife can be found in his correspondence with Benjamin Rush. There is also some correspondence of Charles Smith, William's son. The family correspondence stretches into the first three decades of the nineteenth century. In addition to the family correspondence there are some literary writings, primarily poems, of the William Smith and members of his family. 

The collection contains a positive print of the microfilm of the collection done in 1969 while the William Smith Papers were on deposit at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The microfilm is not a complete duplicate of the existing collection. None of the newspapers or their clippings that are in original volume one were filmed.[1] The microfilm does, however, include images of a several of letters of famous people, such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, which are no longer part of the collection.[2] 

The researcher should be aware that there are three other collections of William Smith papers now different now in public repositories. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania has small collection of William Smith papers which called the Smith Family Papers, 1757-1861 (collection 603). This collection was donated by William Smith's grandson, William Rudulph Smith, in 1867 and contains supporting documentation for the 1757 libel case as well as family correspondence from the early nineteenth century. A slightly larger group of materials can be found in the William Smith series of the Jasper Yeates Brinton Collection, 1762-1916 (collection 1619). Another small sampling of material relating to the College of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania now form part of the William Smith Papers in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts of the University of Pennsylvania. Early documentation regarding the Smith's work with the College of Philadelphia can be found in the Archives General Collection of the University Archives and Records Center. 

Endnotes 

[1]Pages 58, 60–76, 79. 

[2]See Appendix A for a detailed list of this material. 

 

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Appendix A

List of Items Included on the 1969 Microfilm of the Collection and no longer a part of this collection. 

Vol. 1, p. 56. Oxford University TO Smith, William 1759 Sept. 27. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) Doctorem in Sacra Theologia. Doctor of Sacred Theology degree. 

Vol. 1, p. 59. Trinity College, Dublin TO Smith, William 1764 Jan. 9. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) Doctorem in Sacra Theologia. Doctor of Sacred Theology degree. 

Vol. 3, p. 41. Franklin, Benjamin TO Smith, William 1753 Apr. 19. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Vol. 3, p. 42. Franklin, Benjamin TO Smith, William 1753 May 3. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Vol. 3, p. 43. Franklin, Benjamin TO Smith, William 1754 Apr. 18. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 33 cm. 

Vol. 3, p. 44–45. Franklin, Benjamin 1784 Jun. 25. AD. 7 p. (4 leaves) ; 32 cm. "Loose Thoughts on a universal Fluid &c." 

Vol. 3, p. 46. Franklin, Benjamin TO Smith, William 1782 Sept. 22. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) 

Vol. 3, p. 48. Jefferson, Thomas TO Smith, William 1791 Apr. 28. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 24 cm. 

Vol. 3, p. 49. Washington, George TO Corporation and Inhabitants of the Borough of Lancaster n. d. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) 

Vol. 3, p. 123. Smith, Thomas Duncan TO Smith, William Moore 1782 May 9. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) 

 

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Appendix B

Contents of Volume 4 of the William Smith Papers in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, Library of the University of Pennsylvania 

The volume has been disbound, but its binding retained. The title, printed in gold leaf on the spine of the binding, is: "[Volume] 4: College, Academy & Charity School, University of Pennsylvania." 

In 1960, Neda W. Westlake, the Curator of the Rare Book Collection at the University Library, prepared the descriptive inventory copied below and it was published in the Spring 1960 issue of The Library Chronicle (at p. 107). The inventory has been annotated here to show the consecutive pagination, applied by an unknown hand, but probably that of John Hill Brinton, and to indicate in brackets the present box and folder number used by the University Library. 

 

pp. 12–49: Dr. Smith's small, blue-bound and battered notebook, listing in his hand the amount of money and the donors to the College and Academy which he elicited on his trip to England in 1762 (in 1964, Jasper Yeates Brinton, Neda M. Westlake, and the University of Pennsylvania Press reproduced this manuscript in a limited facsimile edition, titled The Collection Books of Provost Smith). [Now labeled as William Smith Collection, Ms. Coll. 599, folder 22] 

pp. 50–58: a printed item, "William Smith, D.D., to the Assembly," excerpted from the Pennsylvania Gazette, 19 May 1788, which concerned the charter of the College. [Now labeled as William Smith Collection, Ms. Coll. 599, folder 23] 

pp. [59–66]: a printed item, Additional Charter, of the College, Academy and Charitable School of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Franklin and Hall, 1755, which is a rare folio pamphlet, with marginalia and corrections in Dr. Smith's hand. [Now labeled as William Smith Collection Ms. Coll. 599, folder 24] 

pp. 67–114: William Smith's desk book containing in his hand the Charter, Laws, and Regulations for the College . . . , Minute Relative to the French School . . . and Medical Schools, 1772–1789 (in honor of the University's 200th anniversary celebration, in 1940, Jasper Yeates Brinton reproduced this manuscript in a limited facsimile edition) [Now labeled as William Smith Collection, Ms. Coll. 599, folder 25] 

pp. 115–16: a printed item, the "University Act," extracted from the Minutes of the Assembly, 27 November 1779 [Now labeled as William Smith Collection, Ms. Coll. 599, folder 26] 

pp. 117–54: rough minutes of the meetings of the Board of Trustees in the years 1789–1791 in the hand of the Provost who was also the secretary of the Board of Trustees [Now labeled as William Smith Collection, Ms. Coll. 599, folder 27] 

 

Not paginated and therefore probably not part of Volume IV of the Brinton Collection, but included by Westlake as among the manuscripts donated by Brinton in 1960: 

 

A letter dated 15 December 1761 signed by Dr. Richard Peters, President of the Board of Trustees, authorizing Dr. Smith to make the collections in England [Now labeled as William Smith Collection, Ms. Coll. 599, folder 1] 

Dr. Smith's commonplace book, with excerpts from English poetry. [Now labeled as William Smith Collection, Ms. Coll. 599, folder 17] 

Two manuscript sermons of Dr. Smith [Now labeled as William Smith Collection, Ms. Coll. 599, folders 7-8] 

 

 

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Appendix C

Descendants of William and Rebecca (Moore) Smith Showing Provenance of Distinct Collections of Smith papers 

William and Rebecca (Moore) Smith had eight children: William Moore Smith (1759–1821), Thomas Duncan Smith (1760–1789), Williamina Elizabeth (Smith) (1762–1790), Charles Smith (1765–1836), Phineas Smith (1767–1770), Richard Smith (1769–1823), Rebecca (Smith) (1772–1837), and Eliza (1776–1778). 

1) William Moore Smith married Ann Rudulph and had three children: 

 

b. Samuel Wemyss Smith (1796–1819; who did not marry) 

 

2) Thomas Duncan Smith graduated from the College of Philadelphia in 1776, studied medicine, and settled in Huntingdon, a small town on the Juniata River in central Pennsylvania. There, in November, 1787, he became a Justice of Huntingdon County, but he took ill and died less than two years later. He did not marry. 

3) Williamina Elizabeth Smith married Charles Goldsborough and had four children: 

 

b. William Smith Goldsborough (1786–1813; who apparently did not marry) 

c. Sarah Yeabery Goldsborough (1787–1862; who married Charles Goldsborough of Shoal Creek, Maryland) 

 

4) Charles Smith graduated from Washington College, Maryland in 1783, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in Philadelphia in 1786. He settled in Sunbury, the county seat of Northumberland County, in central Pennsylvania. In 1791 he married Mary Yeates, the daughter of Jasper Yeates. They lived in Lancaster, where they had eight children. In 1819 he was appointed President Judge of the Pennsylvania District of Adams, Cumberland and Franklin counties and a year later, he was appointed President Judge of the District Court of Lancaster City and County. In the last decade of his life he and his family moved to Baltimore and then to Philadelphia, where he died. His children were: 

 

b. William Wemyss Smith (1795–1825) 

c. Williamina Elizabeth Smith (1797–1848; who married Thomas B. McElwee, of Philadelphia) 

d. Sarah Yeates Smith (1802–1847; who married Leonard Kimball, of Philadelphia) 

e. Charles Edward Smith (1804–1829, who married "Miss" Owen, of Baltimore) 

f. Mary Margaret Smith (1806–1870; who married George Brinton, of Philadelphia). George and Mary (Smith) Brinton were the parents of four children, the eldest of whom was John Hill Brinton (1832–1907). John Hill Brinton organized the Brinton collection of William Smith papers perhaps as early as 1865, when Horace Wemyss Smith published To the University of Oxford. The underwritten representation in Behalf of William Smith from the Brinton collection.[1] John Hill Brinton married and Sarah Ward and they became the parents of four sons, the youngest of whom was Jasper Yeates Brinton (1878–1973). Jasper Yeates Brinton inherited the Smith papers on his father’s death or shortly thereafter, as they were in his possession when he traveled to Egypt in 1922. 

g. Theodore Horatio Smith (1809–1837) 

 

5) Phineas Smith did not marry. 

6) Richard Smith studied law and was admitted to the bar in Philadelphia in 1792. He was admitted to the bar in Huntingdon County in 1795. In 1797 he was elected to the Pennsylvania State Senate from a district which included portions of the counties of Bedford, Huntingdon, and Somerset. He served four years in the State Senate, then returned to Huntingdon, where he lived the remainder of his life. He married Letitia Nixon Coakley in 1804, but they had no children. 

7) Rebecca Smith married Samuel Blodget, Jr. and had four children: 

 

b. Julia Ann Allen Blodget (1795–1877; who married John Britton, Jr., of Philadelphia) 

c. Elinor Matilda Blodget (1797–1833; who married Abel Lincoln, of Massachusetts) 

 

8) Eliza Smith did not marry. 

Endnotes 

[1] The Recommendation of William Smith, A. M. to the University of Oxford (Philadelphia, 1865). 

 

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CONTROLLED ACCESS HEADINGS

Corporate Name(s)

  • College, Academy, and Charitable Schools of Philadelphia.
  • Columbia University. -- General subdivision--History.;
  • Episcopal Church. -- General subdivision--History.;
  • King's College (New York, N.Y.).
  • Society for the Propagating Christian Knowledge Among the Germans Settled in Pennsylvania.

Geographic Name(s)

  • Pennsylvania--History--Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775.
  • Pennsylvania--History--Revolution, 1775-1783.

Personal Name(s)

  • Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme, 1737-1801
  • Goldsborough, Charles, 1761-1801
  • Hamilton, James, 1710-1783
  • Jay, James, Sir, 1732-1815
  • Maskelyne, Nevil, 1732-1811
  • Penn, John, 1729-1795
  • Penn, Juliana, 1729-1801
  • Penn, Thomas, 1702-1775
  • Peters, Richard, 1704-1776
  • Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
  • Smith, Charles, 1765-1836
  • Smith, Rebecca, 1733-1793
  • Yeates, Jasper, 1745-1817

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INVENTORY

 

Original Volume One 

Box

Folder

Vol 1, p. 1-2, 14. Smith, William 1758 Jan. 6. ADS. 19 p. (19 leaves) ; 41 cm. 

Description

Petition to the King including report of trial with list of subscribers. 

5

1

Vol 1, p. 3. Smith, William 1758 Feb. 6. ADS. 5 p. (3 leaves) ; 38 cm. 

Description

Petition of William Smith to the King's Most Excellent Majesty in Council appealing his case whereby he was found guilty by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives of Libel and imprisoned without the benefit of a trial. With a list of subscribers. Document also contains an account of the trial. 

1

1

Vol 1, p. 4. Moore, Charles TO Smith, William 1758 Jan. 13. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 19 x 29 cm. 

Description

Order of Charles Moore, Clerk of Court to William Smith demanding his appearance before House to answer charges against him. Smith's notations call the order "strange" as to the severity of the order as well as the fact that charges have not yet been communicated. Includes a response and observations by William Smith. 

1

2

Vol 1, p. 5. Moore, Charles TO Smith, William 1758 Jan. 13. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Requesting the name of his Council. 

1

3

Vol 1, p. 6. 1758 Jan. 27. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 19 cm. 

Description

Address of thanks to Governor Denny on his refusal to comply with the Assembly's desire to judge on impeachment without granting the right of trial by jury. 

1

4

Vol 1, p. 7. Kirk, Samuel TO Smith, William 1759 Dec. 8. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) : 20 cm. 

Description

Bill for £9.19.6 for twenty days total custody and for bringing Smith before the Bar of the House. Examined and allowed by Charles Moore. Smith notes this as fees extorted by the Assembly. 

1

5

Vol 1, p. 8. [Bradford, William] 1758 Jan. 18. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 32 cm. 

Description

William Bradford's deposition and examination regarding the printing, proofing, and correcting of William Moore's manuscript in the case against Smith. 

1

6

Vol 1, p. 9. Leech, Thomas TO Kirke, Samuel 1758 Sept. 27. ADS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 14 x 20 cm. 

Description

Arrest order for William Moore with signature of Samuel Kirke attesting to the fact that Smith has "a true copy." 

1

7

Vol 1, p. 10. [Bond, Thomas] 1758 Jan. 13. AD. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Examination and deposition of Thomas Bond regarding the emendations to Moore's address and testifying that neither of the two copies was in the hand of William Smith. 

1

8

Vol 1, p. 11. [Bond, Phineas] 1758 Jan. 17. AD. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Examination and deposition of Phineas Bond regarding the emendations to Moore's address and testifying to the fact that legal Council offered the opinion that such an address was within the rights of William Moore. 

1

9

Vol 1, p. 12-13. Smith, William TO Hamilton, James n. d. [1758]. AL. 5 p. (3 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Copy of letter from William Smith, Jr. to James Hamilton of New York thanking him and other lawyers of New York for their opinions on his father's case including Rev. William Smith's response to his son. 

1

10

Vol 1, p. 15. n. d. [1758]. AL. 5 p. (3 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

"A Case for Counsel" outlining the Smith case and posing questions on the right of the Governor, as the King's Representative, to dissolve Assemblies. 

1

11

Vol 1, p. 16. Pratt, C.; Yorke, C. 1759 June 2. ADS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Opinion reviewing the charges against Smith arguing that Moore's publication was a libel but finding that Smith's rights had been violated. 

1

12

Vol 1, p. 17. Hamilton, James TO Smith, William 1758 May 25. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Advising Smith of a need for a Report on the case to be filed by Solicitor General before the case can be taken before the king. He further states that the denial of Habeas Corpus was unjust. Hamilton believes that Smith will be freed once such a case is made to the king's court yet Hamilton is sensitive to the loss of freedom and advises Smith on the possibilities of acknowledging a role for the sake of release. 

1

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Vol 1, p. 18. Smith, William TO Hamilton, James 1758 Mar. 12. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Smith writes from confinement without any immediate sense of freedom. He is willing to fight against this groundless charge for the sake of all who love liberty and justice. Smith reviews checks and balances inherent in the English legal system and demands that his case at least serve to check the Assemblies' power. 

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Vol 1, p. 19. [Smith, William] n. d. [1758]. AD. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Request for opinion on the case of William Smith. 

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Vol 1, p. 20. Smith, William TO House of Assembly 1760 Feb. 11. AD. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Statement of William Smith regarding a bill of costs sent to him after returning from England. 

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Vol 1, p. 21. Supplement to the New York Mercury (clipping). 1758 Sept. AD. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 38 cm. 

Description

Mr. Moore's Charges to the Jury on the sanctity of the jury system and dangers inherent when the Governor or some other legislative body denies the rights of a trial by jury. Moore delivered these charges to the Grand Jury of Chester County as he resumed his seat as President of the Court of Common Pleas shortly after his acquittal before the Governor and Council of Pennsylvania. 

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Vol 1, p. 22. Smith, William n. d. [1758]. AD. 9 p. (5 leaves) ; 37 cm. 

Description

Statement regarding Mr. Moore's case and the case of William Smith. 

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Vol 1, p. 23. [Morris, Robert Hunter] TO Pennsylvania Assembly 1755, 1758 copy. AD. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Draft of message for publication regarding the relationship of the Governor with the Assembly and in particular the Assembly's to raise money in defense of the colony. 

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Vol 1, p. 24. Smith, William TO James Hamilton 1760 Feb. 11. AD. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Petition to James Hamilton regarding fees from the transactions of the Assembly for 1758 demanding that Smith pay expenses incurred by the Assembly during his incarceration which was decided in Smith's favor. 

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Vol 1, p. 25. Treby, George TO Lords of Trade 1690 Sept. 1, 1758 Apr. 19 copy. AD. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Report of George Treby regarding the right of the crown to appoint a governor of Maryland to prevent the danger of losing the province to the enemy. 

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Vol 1, p. 26. Holt, John TO Lords of Trade 1690 June 3; 1758 Apr. 19 copy. AD. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Right of the Crown to appoint a governor of Maryland in cases of necessity. 

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Vol 1, p. 27. Ward, Edward; Trevor, Thomas TO Queen's Most Excellent Majesty 1694 July 12; 1758 Apr. 20 copy. AD. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Report of the Attorney and Solicitor General to her Majesty on the right of appointing a governor of Pennsylvania in extraordinary cases to protect the inhabitants. (Copy from the Plantation Office). 

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Vol 1, p. 28. Justices in Council TO Penn, William 1699 Aug. 31; [1758 copy]. AD. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Order to Mr. Penn recommending that Penn remedy the several irregularities and undue practices in Pennsylvania. Representatives have called for a standing militia to which the Council agreed. Further the governors of the colonies of Pennsylvania, East and West New Jersey, and New York are to safely transport those being held on piracy charges, with the prizes and other property, to England for punishment according to the law. 

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Vol 1, p. 29. Lords of Trade TO Penn, William 1699 Sept. 12; 1758 May 2 copy. AD. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Order to William Penn to remove the Attorney General and Justice of the Peace from employment. Smith used this as a precedent in his case against the Pennsylvania Assembly. 

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Vol 1, p. 30. Lords of Trade TO Penn, William 1703 July 30; [1758] copy. AD. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Nullifying the currency act of Pennsylvania and ordering that the Governor, the Proprietor, and the Assembly not repass the currency act which would regulate coin and further not to do so without direction from the Queen. 

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Vol 1, p. 31. Northey, Edward; Harcourt, Simon TO Queen 1707; 1758 Apr. 19 copy. AD. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Report of the Lords of Trade to her Majesty on her right to appoint a governor for Rhode Island and for Connecticut. 

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Vol 1, p. 32. Yorke, Sir Philip; Wearg, Clement TO King 1724 Oct. 31; [1758] copy. AD. 22 p. (12 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Report on Governor Samuel Shute's complaint of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The Lords reviewed a number of problems including the illegal felling of trees which by law had been reserved for the Royal Navy; the House of Representatives refusal of the right of the royal government to negate their choice of Speaker; the Houses vote of a public fast heretofore only authorized by the Crown; the House's action to adjourn themselves which is in the power of the Governor; the lack of application by the House to the Crown regarding the building of forts and collection receipts; the Councils unwillingness to pay a Major in her Majesty's forces; and the House's establishment of their own committee outside of the Crown for the command of troops. 

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Vol 1, p. 33. Committee of Council TO King 1725 May 29; [1758] copy. AD. 11 p. (6 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Report of the Committee of Council in Governor Shute's compliant against the House of Representatives of Massachusetts Bay Colony with concern over the breach of power by the House. 

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Vol 1, p. 34. Ordinance in Council 1732 June 16; [1758] copy. AD. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Ordering the release of John Hardy from imprisonment in Jersey upon the original petition and not by way of appeal. 

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Vol 1, p. 35. Dunlap, Francis 1755 Jan. 23; [1758] copy. AD. 6 p. (4 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Ordinance in Council. Petition of Francis Dunlap imprisoned at Jamaica and the Order in Council for his release. 

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Vol 1, p. 36-38. Smith, William 1758 Apr. 6. AD. 34 p. (18 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

The case of William Smith against the Assembly of Pennsylvania. 

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Vol 1, p. 39. Smith, William n. d. [1758]. AD. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Extracts and notes of William Smith on classical history, power, and the present government. 

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Vol 1, p. 40. Hamilton, James TO Smith, William 1758 Apr. 4. AD. 14 p. (9 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Bill from James Hamilton to William Smith outlining account of Smith's defense in his Complaint Against the Assembly of Pennsylvania. 

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Vol 1, p. 51. Lincoln, John TO Bishop of London 1753 Dec. 21. ADS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 cm. with seal 13cm. 

Description

Deacon's Orders for William Smith from the Bishop of Lincoln to the Bishop of London. 

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Vol 1, p. 52. Carlisle, Richard TO Bishop of London 1753 Dec. 23. ADS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 cm. with seal 13 cm. 

Description

Priest's Orders for William Smith from the Bishop of Lincoln to the Bishop of London. 

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Vol 1, p. 53. London, Thomas TO Smith, William 1753 Dec. 23. ADS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 x 33 cm. 

Description

Priest License to William Smith to serve as a Priest in Pennsylvania. With seal and stamps. 

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Vol 1, p. 54. Smith, William 1753 Dec. 23. ADS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 x 33 cm. 

Description

Declaration by Smith to the Confirmation of the Liturgy of the Church of England. With seal and signature of Thomas London, Bishop of London. 

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Vol 1, p. 55. Representation. TO University of Oxford 1759 Mar. 12. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 27 cm. 

Description

To the University of Oxford. The underwritten representation in Behalf of William Smith. Offers a testimonial of the behalf of William Smith's loyalty and his interest in religion, learning and good government, in support of the University offering Smith the Degree of Doctor in Divinity. 

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Vol 1, p. 57. Aberdeen, Scotland. TO Smith, William 1759 Mar. 12. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 49 x 50 cm. 

Description

Doctorem Sacrosancte Theologia. Doctor of Theology degree. 

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Vol 1, p. 58. [1762 Nov. 2]. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 41 cm. English newspaper advertisements. 

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Vol 1, p. 60. Newport Mercury. 1775 Sept. 25. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 39 cm. 

Description

Resolution of New York's Provincial Congress forbidding support of any other government or militia other than that of the Continental Congress. 

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Vol 1, p. 61. 1779 Jan. 1. 26 p. (12 leaves) ; 26 cm. Proceedings on the Trial of Admiral Keppel By a Court Martial held at Portsmouth, Thursday, January 7, 1779 (incomplete) 

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Vol 1, p. 62. The Pennsylvania Packet. 1779 May 13. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 42 cm. 

Description

Letter on page two signed CATO by William Smith regarding the conduct of jury in the case of Mr. Franks accused of passing information to the enemy. 

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Vol 1, p. 63. The Pennsylvania Gazette. 1783 Feb. 14; 1783 June 4; and 1785 Sept. 28. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 37 cm. (and 2 clippings) 

Description

Memorial of William Smith to the Assembly of Pennsylvania regarding the College and Smith's petition to be granted a trial at law regarding the removal of Smith and the Trustees as guardians of the state's University. 

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Vol 1, p. 64. Pennsylvania Gazette. 1783 July 16. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 42 cm. 

Description

George Washington's letter on the end of the war and lasting peace before his retirement from public life (before his election to the Presidency). Includes an account of the first commencement of Washington College with a valedictory oration by Charles Smith. (Washington College was founded by William Smith in Maryland after the state removed him and the other Trustees from trusteeship through the creation of the University.) 

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Vol 1, p. 65. The Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser. 1783 Dec. 16; [1783 Sept. 9]. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 40 cm. 

Description

Letter of William Smith to Patrick Allison of Baltimore responding to a letter signed Vindex regarding Smith's right and that of the Episcopal Clergy to "pray for 'leave to consult, prepare and offer a bill.'" This being viewed as a common right, it was customary for petitioners to ask and obtain for leave before offering a bill. Smith goes on to defend himself and the Assembly's right to grant him such leave. Smith's ultimate goal is to present a bill outlining the revised liturgy, forms of prayer, and public worship. 

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Vol 1, p. 67. Supplement to Pennsylvania Gazette. 1784 Oct. 6. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 41 cm. (and clipping) 

Description

Address to the State of Pennsylvania in General Assembly regarding the restoration of the College Charter and defending William Smith. 

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Vol 1, p. 68. The Maryland Gazette. [Charles Henry Wharton] 1784 Oct. 7. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 42 cm. 

Description

A letter to the Roman Catholics of Worcester refuting Catholic doctrine and rules such as celibacy, transubstantiation, the right of priests to forgive sins and other aspects that the writer argues are not in the scriptures. 

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Vol 1, p. 69. The Maryland Gazette. [Charles Henry Wharton] 1784 Oct. 14. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 42 cm. 

Description

A letter to the Roman Catholics of Worcester refuting Catholic doctrine and rules such as infallibility and the figurative vs. literal sense of scriptures. 

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Vol 1, p. 70. The Maryland Gazette. Charles Henry Wharton 1784 Oct. 21. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 42 cm. 

Description

Conclusion of letter by Charles Henry Wharton to the Roman Catholics of Worcester refuting Catholic doctrine and rules finally states that before he takes his leave he should declare that he is a universal Christian catholic. 

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Vol 1, p. 71. [William Smith] 1785 Apr. 4. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 43 cm. 

Description

Answer to the Planter; so far especially as concerns the Colleges, or University [broadside]. Defending legislation that would tax salt with the benefit going to the institutions of higher learning in Maryland. 

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Vol 1, p. 72. The Federal Gazette and Philadelphia Evening Post. 1789 Jan. 27. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Letter to the Inhabitants of New Jersey regarding the election of four representatives to the Federal Government; Epistle from Thomas Mifflin on his appointment to Government of Pennsylvania. 

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Vol 1, p. 72. The Independent Gazetteer or, the Chronicle of Freedom. 1789 Jan. 29. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Contains information on the "Considerations on the Relative situation of France and the United States regarding commerce and the significance of the American Revolution to the well being of France" as well as foreign, American, and Philadelphia intelligence. 

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Vol 1, p. 72. The Federal Gazette and Philadelphia Evening Post. 1789 Jan. 30. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Contains information and opinions on the new government and lobbies for the federalists of Delaware and Maryland in joining Pennsylvanians in the vote for George Washington as President and John Adams as Vice President. 

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Vol 1, p. 72. The Federal Gazette and Philadelphia Evening Post. 1789 Feb. 5. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Reporting the election of Edward Hand, George Gibson, John Arndt, Collenson Reed, Lawrence Keene, James Wilson, James O'Harra, David Grier, Samuel Potts, and Alexander Graydon as electors of and for the State of Pennsylvania. 

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Vol 1, p. 72. The Independent Gazetteer or, the Chronicle of Freedom. 1789 Feb. 4. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Publishing the proceeding of the Legislature of New York regarding the appointment of Senators to represent New Jersey in the Senate of the Congress of the United States. 

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Vol 1, p. 73. Sturber, Dr. TO Smith, William 1789 Mar. 4. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Newspaper. Poem addressed to William Smith in the restoration of the Charter and funds of the College by the Assembly of Pennsylvania. 

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Vol 1, p. 74. National Gazette. 1792 Oct. 24. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 42 cm. 

Description

Contains general news both foreign, national and local including a letter from George Logan to the Philadelphia Society for the Promotion of Agriculture and Domestic Manufacture regarding the cultivation of flax; a letter from Americanus responding to the "Citizen of Philadelphian" on excise tax; and a response to a medical lecture. 

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Vol 1, p. 75. General Advertiser. 1799 Aug. 14. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 49 cm. 

Description

Contains a letter to the Freemen of Lancaster County attacking the candidacy of Charles Smith for Governor and supports Thomas McKean. 

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Vol 1, p. 76. Bache's Philadelphia Aurora. 1799 Sept. 4. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 49 cm. 

Description

Offers local news and a letter to the Republicans Citizens of the County of Bucks in support of Thomas McKean for Governor. 

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Vol 1, p. 77-78. n. d. AD. 26 p. (14 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

"The Times a Poem" an anti-Revolutionary poem in three parts, the last three and a half pages printed. 

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Vol 1, p. 79. Pennsylvania Gazette. 1754 Dec. 31. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 38 cm. 

Description

Contains public debates of the Assembly of Pennsylvania regarding paper money and the Royal Instruction to Proprietary Governors. Also advertises for a lottery in support of Academy. 

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Return to the top

 

Original Volume Two 

Box

Folder

Vol 2, p. 1. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1753 Oct. 18. LS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Expresses pleasure at the kind words Col. Martin has shared on Smith's behalf. Thanks Smith for advice on the education of his nephew, but feels a European education more suitable, especially in light of the fact that his nephew's estate is not in America. Expects to be in Pennsylvania soon and will advise Smith of the date so that Penn may see Mr. Collins. 

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Vol 2, p. 2. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1754 Aug. 14. LS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Relates his satisfaction over the reception Smith received from the Academy and thanks him for his zeal in his endeavors on Penn's behalf particularly in regard to his advice on the German Schools. Reports on the birth of Penn's son William, named for the founder, and comments on Smith's religious "orders." Marked "Duplicate" and also dated May 14, 1754. 

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Vol 2, p. 3. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1754 Aug. 14. LS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Relates his satisfaction over the reception Smith received from the Academy and thanks him for his zeal in his endeavors on Penn's behalf particularly in regard to his advice on the German Schools. Reports on the birth of Penn's son William, named for the founder, and comments on Smith's religious "orders." Marked "Duplicate" and also dated May 14, 1754. 

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Vol 2, p. 4. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1755 Feb. 28. LS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Reports favorably on receipt of several letters and minutes which Penn will forward to Mr. Chandler once copies are made stating further that Chandler has heard of the favorable responses of the Germans at Hanover and Skippack to Smith's proposals. Penn expects additional similar responses in the future from ministers of Calvinist and Lutheran congregations. Suggests correcting "their" to "the" people in the account of the Society with particular respect to the establishment of schools as other congregations may interpret that the funds raised would apply principally to their maintenance rather than to the general cause. Relates concern over the death of Mr. Martin and comments on the moving eulogy given by Smith. Reports of Mr. Barton's success and salary as a missionary in Pennsylvania. Discusses his surprise at the shyness of strangers in Pennsylvania but urges Smith to stay true to his mission in promoting the welfare of the Academy. Mentions communication with Mr. Peters concerning giving a lot for the purposes of building a church and indicates that if one is given, an additional one must be granted for the purposes of the meeting; Penn is inundated with requests for lots. Agrees to a change in Charter for the Academy by another name with the power of conferring degrees and adds that no additional trustees will be approved without Penn's recommendation, including the "present Governor," but suggests the addition of Mr. Shoemaker. Comments on the reception of school establishment by the Germans and the likelihood of the passage of a law requiring the swearing of oaths which excludes the Quakers. 

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Vol 2, p. 5-6. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1755 Oct. 24. ALS. 7 p. (4 leaves) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Penn acknowledges the receipt of several letters. He is very pleased of the account given by Smith of the press of the schools. Penn approves of the Governor's changes to the charter of the Academy and gives Smith his support as the head of the school expecting to do everything in his power to continue to promote Smith's position. Penn further discussed the state of the German Schools. He offers his manor in Bucks County for the benefit of the College and has granted a Church Lot in accordance with Smith's wishes. Despite his generosity Penn warns he must be careful to promote the school without jeopardizing the legacy of his children. Penn returns to the religious affairs of the Germans, in particular the Lutherans and Calvinist ministers. Penn's relationship with Benjamin Franklin is discussed as Penn is not happy with Franklin's role in the schools or in the Pennsylvania Assembly. Penn encourages Smith to continue to send news of Franklin's activities. Penn is sending money to the public in hopes to quell objections to taxation and quitrents. Further discussion is given to the right to appoint a governor and the privileges granted by the charter of privileges to his father. Julianna and Thomas had another son and hope that their sons will be educated under Smith's direction in Philadelphia. 

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Vol 2, p. 7. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1756 Feb. 15. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Penn reports of the demands of public business upon his time. He is happy to learn that the gift to the public came in time to stop contention to the bill. Penn comments that the Militia Law passed by the Pennsylvania Assembly is a bad one and he thinks the Lords of Trade will recommend that it be repealed. Still Penn anticipates that the colony will have the ability to raise its own defense. Penn asks Smith to ascertain what Franklin's sentiments are regarding the post office. Penn expects to use this as a method for gaining greater support from Franklin for the King or to have him removed. (In a postscript Penn writes that this is not possible but reports that the present Assembly will be dissolved.) Penn thanks Smith for his quiet service but warns him that he feels by the newspaper accounts that people are beginning to suspect Smith. 

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Vol 2, p. 8. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1756 Sept. 12. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Giving Smith the opinion that he should not have made or published the affidavit and that he should have consulted with his Friends before publishing such a controversial paper. 

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Vol 2, p. 9. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1756 Oct. 6. ALS. 3 p. (4 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Describes the greatly reduced cash flow from Pennsylvania land sales as a result of the outbreak of the Seven Years War in Pennsylvania. Penn reveals that his financial support of the College of Philadelphia is a percentage share of his Pennsylvania revenues and with those revenues severely curtailed, he will not move forward with any pledges or gifts to the College. Urges Smith to develop a constructive working relationship with Philadelphia Quakers; advises Smith that negotiations with the Indians are better than offensive attacks; advises Smith strongly that he should drop his public dispute with Daniel Roberdeau, noting that Penn's advisors are of the opinion "that as Provost of the College you would do well to avoid controversy unless called to it on some great occasion." Penn also discusses Richard Peters' letter of confidence in Smith and his own support of Smith both at the College and with the Bishop of London and the Archbishop of Canterbury. Penn closes by chastising Smith for the extreme statements he made in response to Roberdeau's charges and states "I hope this will find you at [the] head . . . of the Provost Vice Provost and Professors of the College." Both Penn and Smith appear to be very concerned about the charges brought against Smith. 

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Vol 2, p. 10. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1757 Jul. 8. LS. 3 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Commentary on the political situation in Pennsylvania including the provincial election of November 1756, Franklin's arrival in London and his complaint against the Penn family, Penn's concern for the defenseless frontier settlers in Pennsylvania, his strong criticism of the Quaker party, and in his opinion, its deception of the people of Pennsylvania. He concludes by stating his strong support of Smith but advises Smith to follow "the mildest methods, provided they are effectual and the best." 

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Vol 2, p. 11. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1757 Jul. 8. LS. 3 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Commentary on the political situation in Pennsylvania including the provincial election of November 1756, Franklin's arrival in London and his complaint against the Penn family, Penn's concern for the defenseless frontier settlers in Pennsylvania, his strong criticism of the Quaker party, and in his opinion, its deception of the people of Pennsylvania. He concludes by stating his strong support of Smith but advises Smith to follow "the mildest methods, provided they are effectual and the best." Duplicate of above. 

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Vol 2, p. 12. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1758 May 26. LS. 3 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Penn describes his multiple efforts to assist Smith in winning vindication in his dispute with the Provincial Assembly of Pennsylvania; Penn has involved his personal lawyer, Ferdinand Paris, the Bishop of London, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Dr. Samuel Chandler on Smith's behalf; Penn also comments favorably on Jacob Duché who is a student at Clare Hall in Cambridge University. 

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Vol 2, p. 13. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1759 Oct. 12. LS. 1 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Penn informs Smith that he cannot act at present on a request from Smith which was being handled for Penn by Lt. Governor James Hamilton. 

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Vol 2, p. 14-15. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1760 May 10; 1760 June 11. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Apologizing for not communicating but reporting that his son was ill and died. Promises to lobby against the Lottery and other acts when the Board of Trade meets Thursday next. Letter on verso dated June 11th stating that the Board of Trade voted against the Lottery. Penn is glad to hear that the Assembly will not renew their attempts against Smith. Comments that if the bill to empower Franklin to receive money of the Treasury is passed then Franklin will stay until the money is ordered out of his hands. 

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Vol 2, p. 16. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1760 June 11. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Stating that the Board of Trade voted against the Lottery and he expected the Lords to report against it. Penn is glad to hear that the Assembly will not renew their attempts against Smith. Comments that if the bill to empower Franklin to receive money of the Treasury is passed then Franklin will stay until the money is ordered out of his hands. Contains a postscript regarding the receipt of documents relative to Smith's case. 

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Vol 2, p. 17. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1760 Oct. 18. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Thanking Smith for letters and packets sent and informing him that they are in his brother's hands. Penn is very pleased with Mr. Morgan. He reports on the Attorney General's argument concerning the Lottery and thanks Smith for the congratulations on the birth of his son. 

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Vol 2, p. 18. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas 1760 Oct. 22. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

A letter of introduction for Samuel Powell describing him as a man with an estate of £40,000, a spirit of good economy, and sound judgment. Smith anticipates that Powell will become one of the most considerable and independent men of the country. Smith also discusses the work done by surveyors regarding the boundaries of Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland. Smith hints at his disappointment that he has not been given the title of Commissioner in this work as the academics from the other provinces enjoy such a rank. 

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Vol 2, p. 19. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1760 Nov. 14. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Penn sends his response to the Address of the Clergy of Pennsylvania. He supports the mission at Reading and will report more information as he obtains it. He questions why the account of the Free Schools shows no credit for money received on his account or that of his family's. Penn has found Mr. Keene and Mr. Morgan as individuals that will bring honor to the College. 

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Vol 2, p. 20. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1761 Jan. 10. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Penn thanks Smith for his assistance with the Commissioners. He reviews land holdings in Delaware and in New Jersey. 

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Vol 2, p. 21. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1761 Jan. 10. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Penn thanks Smith for his assistance with the Commissioners. He reviews land holdings in Delaware and in New Jersey. 

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Vol 2, p. 22. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1762 Jul. AN. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 cm. 

Description

A note informing Smith that Penn is in town and plans to apply for a brief for the Pennsylvania College. Smith notes on the verso that the brief is for New York College. 

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Vol 2, p. 23. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas 1762 Aug. 3. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Requesting that Penn come to town to encourage Smith's brief as this was in the best interest of the colleges of New York and Pennsylvania. 

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Vol 2, p. 24. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1762 Sept. 3. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Advising Smith to stay out of the affair dealing with Mr. Eliot, Mr. Oswald, Dr. Chandlers, and Mr. Allen. 

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Vol 2, p. 25. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas [1763 July 23]. AL fragment. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Pages three and four of a letter from Smith to Penn regarding the fundraising he was conducting for the New York and Philadelphia colleges. Included is information on the perceptions of the English for the colonies and the tactics Smith took to gain donations from the English. 

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Vol 2, p. 26. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas 1763 July 23. ALS fragment. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Page five of a letter from Smith to Penn reporting on the fundraising he was conducting for the New York and Philadelphia colleges. As head of the College he has been instructed to show both the public gratitude of the Trustees as well as his own private gratitude. He is eager to make the best possible petition to the king. 

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Vol 2, p. 27. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1763 Sept. 1. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Penn is pleased to hear Smith has collected so much in his brief and recommends placing his share in Mr. Barlay's hands. He cannot comply with Smith's request about taking his money since Penn's is regularly submitted in one channel which he cannot alter. Penn fears that if the Indian ravages continue he will see little money come into his office. 

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Vol 2, p. 28. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1763 Dec. 22. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Penn expresses concern over Smith's ill health and asks him to write with news of improvement as soon as he is able. 

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Vol 2, p. 29. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 Jan. 10. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Happily replies to the news that Smith is recovering nicely. 

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Vol 2, p. 30. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 Feb. 1. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Writes Smith regarding Penn's payment of bills so that the College of New York would not lose money. Includes with it a note from John Penn as governor asking for information in connection with the claim of Connecticut against Pennsylvania in 1680. 

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Vol 2, p. 31. Sargent, Aufrer and Co. TO Penn, Thomas 1764 Feb. 3. AN. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Informing Penn that Smith has two £500 notes drawn on the account of the College of New York which will be held for a week. 

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Vol 2, p. 32. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 Apr. 9. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Penn writes of great gratitude for Smith's zeal and success in soliciting contributions for the College of Philadelphia. Penn thanks Smith by presenting him with a note of £50. 

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71

Vol 2, p. 33. Penn, Thomas TO Trustees 1764 Apr. 12. LS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Favorable comment and recommendation of William Smith's fundraising efforts in England, 1763-1764. Annotation by Smith on address page. 

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72

Vol 2, p. 34. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 May 18. LS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Additional information on the fundraising tour on behalf of the College of Philadelphia informing Smith of developments which have taken place subsequent to his departure from England. Information regarding obtaining for Smith an office in Chester, Pennsylvania which will pay Smith £150 per year. 

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73

Vol 2, p. 35. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 Aug. 10. LS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Includes approval of Trustees for a £100 increase in Smith's yearly salary; word of Penn's communication with the Archbishop of Canterbury and the latter's approval of Smith's course at the College of Philadelphia; mention of Penn's letter to the Trustees carried by Richard Peters which will amend the by-laws of the College of Philadelphia in order to preserve the Church of England control of the Board of Trustees; describes Penn's opposition to Benjamin Franklin and Smith's assistance in blunting Franklin's influence. 

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Vol 2, p. 36. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 Aug. 10. L [copy]. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Includes approval of Trustees for a £100 increase in Smith's yearly salary; word of Penn's communication with the Archbishop of Canterbury and the latter's approval of Smith's course at the College of Philadelphia; mention of Penn's letter to the Trustees carried by Richard Peters which will amend the by-laws of the College of Philadelphia in order to preserve the Church of England control of the Board of Trustees; describes Penn's opposition to Benjamin Franklin and Smith's assistance in blunting Franklin's influence. 

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Vol 2, p. 37. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 Oct. 12. LS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Discussion of Penn's views on Franklin, Galloway, and the Pennsylvania Assembly and the efforts to change the Pennsylvania government to a royal colony; Dickinson's opposition to Franklin; discussion of William Allen's role and Richard Peters' arrival in London; also contains a copy of a letter of Penn to Smith (Sept. 7, 1764) concerning results of fundraising in England and Penn's pleasure with Dickinson's printed speech. 

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Vol 2, p. 38. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 Oct. 12. LS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Discussion of Penn's views on Franklin, Galloway, and the Pennsylvania Assembly and the efforts to change the Pennsylvania government to a royal colony; Dickinson's opposition to Franklin; discussion of William Allen's role and Richard Peters' arrival in London; does not contain a copy of a letter of Penn to Smith (Sept. 7, 1764) concerning results of fundraising in England and Penn's pleasure with Dickinson's printed speech, but contains addendum of (Nov. 10, 1764) acknowledging receipt of last letter. 

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Vol 2, p. 39. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1764 Dec. 7. LS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Discussion of the Pennsylvania Assembly election results of October 1764 (in terms of Franklin's party vs. the Proprietary party) and state of assembly petition to king for change in Pennsylvania government; contains acknowledgment of receipt of letter (Nov. 10, 1764 as per Oct. 12, 1764 letter). 

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78

Vol 2, p. 40. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1765 Feb. 9. LS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Discussion of Franklin's petition to the king for royal government in Pennsylvania; Franklin's appointment by several colonies to be their agent in London to England and the Crown; and general reaction to the Stamp duty. Additional letter (Jan. 12, 1765) concerning Smith's campaign on behalf of the proprietary form of government (vs. the royal form of government advanced by Franklin) and the lengthy petitions circulated by Smith (signed by Alexander Stedman), signed by Pennsylvania residents and sent to Thomas Penn, all favoring Penn's continuing control of the Pennsylvania government. 

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79

Vol 2, p. 41. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1765 Feb. 15. LS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Advice and comment from Penn to Smith on a number of political and personal matters including continued condemnation of Franklin and praise for Dickinson, Allen and Smith; appended to the February 9th letter as above. 

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80

Vol 2, p. 42-43. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1765 Mar. 8. LS. 5 p. (3 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Composed of various political and business matters in which Smith had a personal interest; addresses role Muhlenberg and Wrangel play in Pennsylvania politics as well as issues relevant to land settlement and first purchasers of Philadelphia; with a copy of the Feb. 15, 1765 letter. 

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81

Vol 2, p. 44. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1765 Apr. 13. LS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Additional references to Franklin's efforts at establishing a royal government and to issues surrounding Philadelphia land title (which Smith had applied directly to Penn to obtain); with copy of letter of Mar. 8, 1765 as described above. 

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82

Vol 2, p. 45. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1765 May 10. LS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Reporting that Franklin has not yet submitted his petition; describing the particulars of successful fundraising for Kings College and the College of Philadelphia; T. Penn confined to home due to the small pox inoculation of his sons; with copy of letter dated Apr. 13, 1765. 

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83

Vol 2, p. 46. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1765 Aug. 15. LS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Thanking Smith for his long letter on the success of Col. Bouquet's military campaign in western Pennsylvania ending Pontiac's War; also concerning a grant of a city lot by Penn to Smith (which he asks Smith not to ask for again!) and obtaining for Smith a sinecure in the Prothonotary's Office of Chester County. 

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84

Vol 2, p. 47. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1765 Sept. 28. LS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Discusses favorably Smith's efforts among Pennsylvania Germans to organize and charter German schools; discusses further final increments of funds raised in England for the College of Philadelphia; dotes on Richard Peters' health and imminent return to Philadelphia; with a copy of letter of Aug. 15, 1765. 

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85

Vol 2, p. 48. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1765 Sept. 28. LS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Discusses favorably Smith's efforts among Pennsylvania Germans to organize and charter German churches; discusses further final increments of funds raised in England for the College of Philadelphia; dotes on Richard Peters' health and imminent return to Philadelphia; does not contain copy of the Aug. 15, 1765 letter. 

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Vol 2, p. 49. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas 1765. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith is gratified to know that Penn has been so pleased by the Oration he made at Commencement acknowledging the support to the schools' benefactors and in particular the Penn family. Penn has provided a lot to Smith with a reasonable ground rent so that Smith may move his stable, back buildings, and kitchen to this property. Smith clarifies an exchange on the matter of Mr. Graham's interest in the Clerk of Peace for Chester and assures Penn that he (Smith) was making no recommendation on Graham's behalf. 

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Vol 2, p. 50. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1766 Apr. 1. LS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Commiserating with Smith over the loss of proprietary faction seats in the Pennsylvania Assembly in the elections in October of 1765; in that election the Franklin party returned to full control of the Assembly; assures Smith that the method of issuing Tavern Licenses will not be altered; urges Smith to see the repeal of the Stamp Act as a great favor done the American colonist by the British government; congratulates Smith on the award of charters to the German churches in Philadelphia, noting particularly the adherence of Sauer and the Germantown residents to the Penn family proprietor; more discussion of Smith's continued requests for financial support through gifts of land and government sinecure; approval of Smith's plan to settle frontier townships through conversion of settlers, this time apparently not Germans but Scots-Irish Presbyterians; encourages Smith generally to keep the peace in Pennsylvania; notes sending of a pair of globes "of a new kind" for the College of Philadelphia. 

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2

Vol 2, p. 51. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1767 Mar. 17. LS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Thanks Smith for copies of competing submissions for the College of Philadelphia's Sargent medal; sympathizes with Smith over losses by proprietary party in 1766 elections of Pennsylvania Assembly; congratulates Smith on the flourishing state of the College of Philadelphia and on other lesser success. 

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3

Vol 2, p. 52. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1767 Jul. 19. LS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Informing the Trustees that he, Penn, has personally reviewed the account books of the College of Philadelphia fund raising effort in England which totaled £10,760, half of which was paid Kings College in New York, the other half to the College of Philadelphia. 

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4

Vol 2, p. 53. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1767 Aug. 7. LS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Congratulates Smith on the College of Philadelphia, commenting on several specific issues, including Dr. Morgan's conflicts; mentions again that the English fund raising was completed and the final account settled. 

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5

Vol 2, p. 54. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1767 Nov. 12. LS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Discourages Smith's proposal to purchase a chaplain's commission in the British army, because of Smith's duties at the College of Philadelphia; offers hospitality to Smith's relation, William Moore. 

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6

Vol 2, p. 55. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1763, July 28. LS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Written to Smith while he was in England raising funds for the College of Philadelphia; one paragraph concerns preparations for Smith's presentation of an appeal directly to King George III. 

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7

Vol 2, p. 56. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1768 Sept. 7. LS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Plans for receiving Duché and Inglis on their arrival in London. 

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8

Vol 2, p. 57. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1769 Mar 3. LS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Discusses Smith's request for a corporate charter for "Clergymen's widows," which Penn has lobbied for with the Society for Propagating the Gospel and the Bishop of London; states the delay is due to the failure of his nephew (John Penn) to send a draft of the Charter to Thomas. Discusses sending "telescope with Dolland's Micrometer" and a nautical almanac which he asks Smith to present "in my name" to the College of Philadelphia; mentions Mason and Dixon's approval of the equipment he sent the Library Company. Mentions ordination of Mr. Coombes and expresses expectation of Coombes' "great service as a minister." Defers response to Smith's request concerning Dr. Wrangel. 

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Vol 2, p. 58. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1769 Jul. 15. LS. 3 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Comments on three letters from Smith, one of which on the transit of Venus which he will forward to Mr. Maskelyne; discusses land settlement issues in Pennsylvania, first a Connecticut land company settlements, and secondly the continuing Maryland boundary disputes; in both instances Penn praises Smith, Thomas Hockley, and [Tench] Tilghman who propose resolutions "most advantageous to us;" with copy of letter of March 3, 1769. 

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10

Vol 2, p. 59. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1770 Mar. 8. LS. 2 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Begins by saying that Penn has recovered from a lengthy illness and acknowledges Smith's letters of August and November 1769; will send Smith the Nautical Almanac of 1767; acknowledges letter of thanks from the trustees of the College of Philadelphia; thanks Smith for his sermon at the opening of the Society for the Support of the Widows and Children of the Clergy, Penn has sent copies to Juliana and John Penn; mentions Mr. Maskelyne and the transactions of the Royal Society in London; discusses his own improving health. 

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11

Vol 2, p. 60. Smith, William TO Penn, John 1772 Apr. 3. LS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith recounts the success of a recent trip to South Carolina where he raised about one thousand Guineas and recruited approximately 20 more students to add to the existing population of 30 students from that colony. Upon his return to Pennsylvania Smith set out on a fundraising tour and met with equal success. He has already raised £1,100 from 80 subscribers and anticipates as much as £2,000. Dr. Morgan was sent in place of Smith to the West Indies to attempt a collection there. Smith refrained from going since he has already spent so much time away from his growing family. To date Smith has raised £9,000. Smith desires to complete his work on the history of Province of Pennsylvania and is still in need of consulting the Penn family papers which Penn's uncle promised to have a clerk copy. Finally Smith advises Penn that Samuel Wharton has received a grant of Lands on the Ohio passed and discussed the implications of this on the boundaries of Pennsylvania. 

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Vol 2, p. 61. Smith, William TO Penn, John 1772 Apr. 4. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Smith petitions Penn on his brother's behalf regarding the creation of a new county to be taken out of Bedford. He reviews the local politics there and lobbies on his brother's behalf for the position of prothonotary. 

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13

Vol 2, p. 62. Penn, John TO Smith, William 1772 June 27. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Congratulates and thanks Smith for all his efforts regarding the College and notes that its future success will owe to his merits. Promises to collect from his uncle's papers whatever might help Smith in writing his history. Penn expects to visit Philadelphia next summer as he is tiring of England. 

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Vol 2, p. 63. Penn, Juliana TO Smith, William 1774 Dec. 3. LS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Juliana Penn, apparently writing for a disabled Thomas Penn, tells Smith that the Western Boundary Line dispute and the Connecticut claim "will engage Mr. Penn's attention this winter." She also says that Penn is pleased Smith will serve as a Commissioner in the Western Boundary Line dispute. 

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15

Vol 2, p. 64. Penn, Juliana TO Smith, William 1774 Dec. 31. LS. 2 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Juliana Penn, apparently writing for an incapacitated Thomas Penn, tells Smith that Thomas Penn has told the Governor of Pennsylvania to name Smith a Commissioner in the Western Boundary Line dispute with the Colony of Virginia and its Governor, the Earl of Dunmore; she informs Smith of the progress of the ongoing dispute with Connecticut over its right to Pennsylvania lands, a case then before Wilmot and the Board of Trade. She asks Smith if he has, or can find in Philadelphia, certain papers relating to this case which cannot be found in England. 

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Vol 2, p. 65. Penn, Juliana TO Smith, William 1775 Aug. 31. LS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Thanks Smith for his letter of condolences on the death of Thomas Penn, on Smith's eulogy of Penn which Smith had published in the Pennsylvania Gazette and on the expected receipt of the parcel which contains an account of the commencement at the College of Philadelphia earlier that year. 

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17

Vol 2, p. 66. Penn, Juliana TO Smith, William 1775 Dec. 21. LS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Acknowledges receipt of the packet concerning the 1775 Commencement of the College of Philadelphia; compliments Smith's protégé William Barton; reports to Smith that the Connecticut dispute is not yet decided. 

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18

Vol 2, p. 67. Penn, Juliana TO Smith, William 1774 Dec. 31 (mis-dated as 1775 Dec. 31; sent by original Packet). LS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Juliana Penn, apparently writing for an incapacitated Thomas Penn, tells Smith that Thomas Penn has told the Governor of Pennsylvania to name Smith a Commissioner in the Western Boundary Line dispute with the Colony of Virginia and its Governor, the Earl of Dunmore; she informs Smith of the progress of the ongoing dispute with Connecticut over its right to Pennsylvania lands, a case then before Wilmot and the Board of Trade. She asks Smith if he has, or can find in Philadelphia, certain papers relating to this case which cannot be found in England. Copy of letter of December 31, 1774 letter. 

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19

Vol 2, p. 68. Smith, William TO Penn, Julianna [1775 Jan.]. AL. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Smith is responding to Julianna's letter of December 31, 1774 requesting information on the boundary dispute between Pennsylvania and Connecticut. He promises to send a pamphlet of questions asked by Mr. Wilmot to Penn. He includes Mr. Ingersoll's copy of the map of Connecticut dated 1766 and dedicated to Lord Shelburne. Smith outlines the Agreement between New York and Connecticut made in 1700 and then ratified and released in 1732. Connecticut received property near the sound and as a result released approximately 60,000 acres, called the Oblong, along the western boundary. 

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20

Vol 2, p. 69. Penn, John, Jr. TO Smith, William 1791 Jul. 9. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Penn expects to transfer property to the College in the form of a deed. He congratulates Smith for his endeavors at recovering the rights of the trustees to the College property. He thanks Smith for his promise of assistance and service in Pennsylvania affairs. 

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21

Vol 2, p. 70. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas [1769 Jan. 4]. AL. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Smith has prepared a plan for a Widows Fund for the clergy of the Church of England. It is similar to that prepared by the Presbyterian clergy and he requests that Penn grant a similar Charter of this corporation. The colonies of New York and New Jersey have agreed to support the incorporation of the organization as well. 

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22

Vol 2, p. 71. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas [1756 June]. AL. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Discusses the trouble he is now having in local politics with the Quakers in particular Mr. Roberdeau, Mr. Riley, and Dr. Jenny of the Episcopal Church. Smith is accused of publishing pamphlets and is in the process of making his defense and has come to realize that he has more friends than he could have imagined. Smith asks Penn for his support in England and informs him that Mr. Griffiths, a publisher, and Dr. Chandler will consult with Penn about making careful refutations of false accounts made against Smith in any English papers. Smith also notes that Mr. [Richard] Peters will be sending Penn his account and encourages him to read this account as a truthful one. Smith heeds Penn's admonishment to avoid future controversies. 

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Vol 2, p. 72. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas n. d. AL [draft]. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Smith discusses the map prepared by his brother sketching out the land west of the Susquehanna River and other boundary issues facing the Penn family. Presents his opinion again of the Scheme of 1766 as a negative of the Penn family as it would minimize the collecting of interest and quit rent on land while increasing the opportunities for land monopolies. Smith goes on to describe public events such as the lottery and the grants made by government. Smith apologizes for taking liberties in discussing so freely current events and asks that the letter be burned after it is read so as not to be understood in the future and thereby bring shame to himself and his large family. 

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24

Vol 2, p. 73. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard n. d. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Smith reiterates his support of the College policy regarding investments that no loans be made with the exception of mortgages. 

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25

Vol 2, p. 74. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1764 July 9. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Smith informs Peters that the New South Sea annuities have been transferred from the Church of Philadelphia to the College. This transfer was made on order of Thomas Penn in consideration of a lot of land he sold them and in order to fulfill his subscription to the College of £500 sterling. 

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26

Vol 2, p. 75. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Nov. 12. AL [draft]. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Smith discusses recent subscriptions to the College and Penn's instructions that this money be used as capital for the uses for which it was given. Smith responds with the Trustees' concerns and assures Peters that all money drawn was let out at six percent interest with strong security. 

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27

Vol 2, p. 77. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Feb. 8. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Smith reviews items in recent newspaper, the Libson News, and mentions that everyone anticipates a Spanish war through the actions of the government and those of the fleet. 

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28

Vol 2, p. 78. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Feb. 11. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith begins by noting that not one word of the Libson News proved to be true. He quote a portion of a letter dated December 12, 1761 from Samuel Chandler regarding financial support and fundraising for the German Schools. 

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29

Vol 2, p. 79. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Feb. 13. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Smith relays that the sale of ten tickets has been made and that the remainder are with Thomas Moore. Smith is disappointed that he has received only £100 in two years which, along with his salary, is not enough to support his family. 

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Vol 2, p. 80. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Mar. 22. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Noting that he has seen the Archbishop and Mr. Penn and expects to be able to continue his work for the College. He further indicates that Franklin has promised assistance but that he leaves for Virginia in six weeks. Penn has already forwarded his answer regarding the Perkessie lands. Smith promises further news for the trustees via Mr. Logan and Dr. Chandler. 

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Vol 2, p. 81. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Mar. 23. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

Notes that he has arrived safely, that he will be publishing a short case to give on his business and that he will write more via Mr. Logan with an account of everything he has done. Penn will do everything he can with the exception of the Perkessie lands. 

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Vol 2, p. 82. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Mar. 28. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 22 cm. 

Description

The Duke of Newcastle has resigned and Dr. Chandler feels discouraged about his effectiveness in helping with the business of the Schools. Chandler asks that very little action be taken until he can see how appointments are made. The resignation of the Chancellor, the Duke of Devonshire, and Lord Anson are anticipated. Smith gives Peters permission to deal with the matter of Mr. Beatty as he sees fit after first discussing it with Dr. Allison. 

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33

Vol 2, p. 83. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Apr. 5. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Smith gives Peters an account of his efforts on behalf of the College. Penn expressed strong support for the school and yet would not agree with the trustees' resolution to sell the Perkessie lands. Nevertheless Penn promised to serve as a zealous advocate for the Academy. Franklin is also over in England and promises to help Smith make out a list of potential benefactors. The Archbishop promised to take Smith before the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel to make a case for the College and also supported the effort through financial contributions. Smith details how the contributions will be received and accounted for. 

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34

Vol 2, p. 84-85. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Apr. [10]. ALS. 6 p. (3 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Contains very much of the same information sent by a different ship. Smith adds that this letter contains similar but not verbatim information as the previously sent letter and that the substance comes from his memorandum book or diary. He mentions that he has just come from the Archbishop of York who is equally zealous to support the College's effort at raising money. 

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35

Vol 2, p. 86. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Apr. 5. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith comments on the conduct of the new Czar in comparison with Alexander or Frederick of Prussia. He understands that Penn has already issued warrants for Smith's land and hopes that Peters has secured and surveyed said land. 

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36

Vol 2, p. 87. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 May 22. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Smith began the collection for the College on April 29th. He includes an account of what he has raised and reports that many are suffering from influenza. Smith is obliged to call upon people to present his case before actually making the collection and he finds this particularly tiring and time consuming. He hoped to make quicker progress. Smith is having some difficulty following Mr. Beatty who is collecting for the Widows fund specifically but is presenting the case as a more general relief fund. Nevertheless he is not discouraged but reports the matter as information for the benefit of the trustees. 

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Vol 2, p. 88-89. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1762 June 10; 1762 June 12. ALS. 6 p. (4 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Received the letter of May 26th learning that Smith arrived in England safely. Peters anticipates Penn's displeasure at allowing an exchange of the Perkessie lands for more profitable land. The Proprietor recently gave a large piece of land to the hospital with a pledge of support of £40 annually. Peters reports that Mr. Stedman and Duché, have attended to the Senior Class examinations. There is news on the trustees and the work on the College building Peters comments on the recent draught and discusses recent Church deliberations. In an additional letter dated June 12, 1762 Peters notes that the Church vestry decided to send Mr. Duché, for orders. 

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Vol 2, p. 90. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 June 30. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Letter of introduction for Mr. Murray appointed by Penn as Missionary for Reading and Molotton. He previously served as one of the King's missionaries in the "Popish parts" of the Highlands. Smith is preparing for his journey to Scotland and Ireland. 

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39

Vol 2, p. 91. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Jul. 10. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Dr. Jay arrived to make application to the people on behalf of the College of New York. Smith is surprised and has begun to hear complaints about the number of applications being made and the scarcity of money in London. Smith anticipates that this double application will be detrimental to the College and had hoped for a joint single application. Robert Charles, Moses Franks, and several other successful merchants are joining Jay's efforts. Lord Bute reassured Dr. Chandler that in spite of the changes, in the government, Chandler's influence on behalf of his charities should remain strong. The German Schools have already received support from the King and Chandler is prepared to make an appeal on behalf of the College. Smith fears that the work of Jay will interfere with Chandler's success. 

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Vol 2, p. 92-93. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Aug. 6. ALS. 8 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith outlines the recent exchanges between Dr. Jay and himself and the politics involved in their fundraising efforts. Jay sought a Brief for the College of New York without speaking to Smith. Smith decided earlier to forgo obtaining such a Brief at the start of his trip, but Lord Granville, knowing of Smith's work assigned the Brief to the College of Philadelphia. Penn and Smith felt they should not take advantage of such a mistake and offered to have the Brief made in both names anticipating that a joint effort would better serve both parties. The King agreed and pledged financial support to both schools. 

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41

Vol 2, p. 94. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Aug. 14. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 37 cm. 

Description

Smith, in consultation with Lord Bute, recommends that additional German Schools be open with the goal of preserving and propagating the English language. Smith comments on his recent exchange with Franklin over a disagreement which was settled in some ways by Mr. Statham. Franklin learned, while at Oxford, that Smith discouraged the awarding of a degree to Franklin in 1759. Smith reminded Franklin of their misunderstanding concerning a clash in the Assembly as well as over the appointment of Post Master. Smith hopes that Peters will be of some assistance to him if the topic arises between Franklin and Peters in the future. 

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24

Vol 2, p. 95-96. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Sept. 14. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Reports on the damage caused by Franklin's recent comments on the College as a "narrow, bigoted Institution" run by the Proprietary Party. Franklin further alleges that the County and Province would support the College more readily if it were not for the people associated with it. Smith's zeal for the College, Franklin asserts, derives from a fear of loss of income. Smith heard this information from a supporter whom Smith reassured with a letter of reference from Dr. Alison, Dr. Allen, Dr. Stedman, Mr. Duché. 

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Vol 2, p. 97. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Sept. 14. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith mildly rebukes Peters for not writing ahead and outlining the expectations around Mr. Duché. He is further unhappy about the indications he has received from his wife that Peters has not spoken on his behalf regarding his lands, already something Penn agreed to as a result of his pleasure over Smith's work on the boundary lines. He has considered quitting the cause but as a founder of the College feels that honor must redirect his focus. Smith comments on New Jersey politics and asks Peters to destroy the letter. 

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Vol 2, p. 98. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1762 Sept. 22. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Reports that the town is sickly but that Mrs. Smith and her family moved to Moorhall to remain presumably until it was safe to return. Peters hopes Smith will assist Duché, in an expeditious ordination. 

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44

Vol 2, p. 99. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Oct. 2. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Smith has secured more information concerning Peters' brother's commission and will wait for more direction. He discussed the collecting by Mr. Beatty of relief for the frontiers, when in reality he was commissioned to collect for the Widow's Fund. Smith fears this will hurt his own efforts for the College. Franklin continues to refer to the College as an "Institution of Dissension" and this inhibits Smith's success. 

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Vol 2, p. 100. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1762 Oct. 12. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

John Allen delivered Smith's letters to Peters. The dissenters are blaming Smith for the problems with Mr. Beatty's commission. Jonathan Alexander Stedman has not been at his iron works and Mr. Chew is busy with a crowded Supreme Court thus making it very difficult for Peters to get letters of reference to Smith. Peters wants more information on the argument between Smith and Franklin. Peters finds Smith was also wrong in the Beatty case as well. He reports that the Smith family is doing well in the country but that many in the town are still sick. 

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Vol 2, p. 101. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1762 Oct. 21. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Peters finds Smith's recent news of success very hopeful. He is grateful for Smith's efforts on behalf of the College. Mrs. Smith and the children remain in the country. Smith's and Mr. Moore's family remain in good health. He asks for news of Dr. Jay and New York and encourages Smith to expedite Duché's efforts at ordination. 

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47

Vol 2, p. 102. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Nov. 23. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Assures Peters he is spending time only on his own affairs. He reiterates that the Beatty affair, he feels, is designed to interrupt the College's efforts. Smith supported Beatty early on, but found his leaving out the Widow's from his solicitation dubious and possibly hurtful to the College's cause. Smith mentioned this to Dr. Shippen but did not expect him to share this concern. Hence the beginning of a charged situation. Smith turns to his frustration with Franklin and his interference of Smith's work. 

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48

Vol 2, p. 103. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Nov. 23. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Reporting to Peters and the trustees of his progress with Dr. Jay. The Brief is proving a great success throughout the kingdom. The king's brief is accompanied by letters from the clergy and the two together are being preached by clergy throughout the areas they visit. He has spent 18 days in Scotland and seven with his aging father. 

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49

Vol 2, p. 104. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Nov. 23. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Smith included his views on the Beatty affair in his official letter to the Trustees because he felt the matter had gotten to a point where he needed to justify himself. This leaf was originally attached to the letter sent to Peters and the Trustees and removed at Smith's direction. 

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50

Vol 2, p. 105. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1762 Sept. 14. ALS. 5 p. (3 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Indicates that permission has been granted for Mr. Duché's ordination by the Archbishop. Smith recounts the event of the ordination. He dispels a rumor that Smith is searching out other opportunities for himself rather than attending to the affairs of the College. Smith reviews Church affairs and well as the progress on the Widow's fund. Smith remains disappointed that Dr. Shippen has supported Franklin's cause against Smith in regard to the Oxford degree. 

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51

Vol 2, p. 106. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1762 Dec. 2. ALS [copy]. 3p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Duché arrived from England and Peters was pleased to learn of how Smith expedited his affairs with skill and zeal. Peters acknowledges that Smith has lost favor with some men of influence but reminds Smith that just as many others view Smith favorably. Peters counsels Smith not to listen to rumors heard and relayed by his relations but to let his purpose and religion motivate him. Peters explains his decisions on the land warrants. Peters feels that Smith has hurt himself by speaking freely to Dr. Allison of the Beatty affair. 

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52

Vol 2, p. 107. Peters, Richard TO his sister via Statham, William [brother-in-law] 1762 Dec. 2. ALS [copy]. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Advises his sister that Smith will spend the winter with her to collect contributions. Peters speaks in glowing terms of the work of the College and his sister will introduce Smith to people of influence. In a post script Peters notes that he has resumed ministerial duties over the past six months, but with Duché's return, in full orders, Peters is now free to travel to London. 

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53

Vol 2, p. 108. Peters, Richard TO Statham, William 1762 Dec. 3. ALS [copy]. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Discusses his role in the ministry and Duché's return. Peters advises his brother of Smith's purpose and hopes he will receive support. Peters asks that he or his nephew provide quarters for Smith. There is an effusion of sentiment over the good work of the Charity schools of Philadelphia and of Liverpool. 

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54

Vol 2, p. 109. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1762 Dec. 13. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

Informs Smith that he has been appointed Rector. Peters requests Smith support him and approach the Bishop of London for acceptance. 

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55

Vol 2, p. 110. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1762 Dec. 18. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Peters recounts discussions held at the Trustees meeting in which adulation was extended towards Smith. The trustees are concerned that Smith will return prematurely and not personally take up the collections in a group of towns. They think that should someone else collect the funds that only half, if that, will be given. Peters urges Smith to reconsider and stay until the business has been completed. Peters concludes with comments on Mr. Stugeon's troubles, the election of new trustees, and the opening of two more schools in Pennsylvania. 

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56

Vol 2, p. 111/112. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Jan. 8. ALS. 6 p. (3 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Smith is pleased that Peters whole heartedly approved his draft of the petition to the king. 11,500 Briefs have been sent out, after which Smith spent a week with his father trusting that the trustees would not find this visit a waste of their time. While there Smith was able to raise more money. He urges Peters to send on Dr. Allison's letters to the Scots clergy. Smith is concerned that the College of New York might hurt Philadelphia's opportunities in Scotland, but he cannot separate them from the fundraising effort. Smith gives a detailed accounting of the money raised as well as the work attendant with their efforts. He is still haunted by the Beatty affair and feels he has been treated unfairly on this matter especially now as he is away from accuser and in the service of the people. Mr. Penn and Dr. Chandler will send an authenticated account of this matter. 

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57

Vol 2, p. 113/114. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 Jan. 15; 1763 Mar. 7. ALS and copy. 7 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

A copy of the January 15th letter as above. In the March letter he outlines his standing in the church including the dates of his ordination. Peters notes that there are no raging politics as everything is peaceful and harmonious. 

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58

Vol 2, p. 115. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 Jan. 15. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Peters asks for Smith's intercession with the Bishop and Archbishop of London. He expects to travel to England while Smith is in London. Peters explains why, in his opinion, he was chosen as Rector. Peters then details his plan to appeal to the Penn family for a charter and a pledge of land for the new church. The two schools, one in Northhampton and one in Lancaster County have not been opened. In the March letter he outlines his standing in the church including the dates of his ordination. Peters notes that there are no raging politics as everything is peaceful and harmonious. 

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59

Vol 2, p. 116. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Feb. 12. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Smith has £500 available on draft. He reviews plans to give sermons on the College's behalf and encourages the College to pursue interest on the funds due the College as a result of the Church lot sale and subsequent transfer of those funds to the College by Penn. The Beatty Affair seems to have been settled and Smith excused. He details his work with Jay on fundraising and the different tact the College of New York has taken with the king. 

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60

Vol 2, p. 117. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Feb. 12. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 38 cm. 

Description

Smith has five substitute preachers ready to give sermons on behalf of the College. He anticipates another £500 shortly to be ready for the College's use. More commentary is offered on the Beatty affair. Smith reviews the efforts made by the New Yorkers on their college's behalf. 

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61

Vol 2, p. 118. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Feb. 13. AL. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 24 cm. 

Description

A postscript for Richards' eyes only written as an attachment to a letter for public consumption. Smith assures Peters of his conduct and asks for loyalty and faith from Peters. Smith is sure that he will be vindicated from the trouble caused by the dissenters. He encourages Peters to protect the charter constitution of the College. 

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62

Vol 2, p. 119. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Mar. 1. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith grows impatient for an Address of Thanks for the Archbishop and other matters not yet attended to by the Trustees. Smith will write shorter accounts to Peters and the Trustees. Smith is working hard at gaining support of preachers to give sermons. Dr. Jay retains only a few acquaintances in the clergy and therefore can be of little help. He feels Duché, would be worth three of Jay. Smith is eager to return to his family and hope that the Trustees will give him discretionary powers to decide when his mission has been completed. Nevertheless he promises to take their orders seriously either way. 

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63

Vol 2, p. 120. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Mar. 3. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Discusses his views of Mr. Duché's youthfulness as a possible reason to detain his advancement into a religious office. Duché's friends have interpreted these events to mean Smith was an enemy, but Smith explains this is not so. The Bishop of London is prejudiced against Mr. Sturgeon in spite of Smith's advocacy. Smith pleads with Peters to wait until he returns before setting out for England. Smith asks Peters if he has received the acquittal of Smith in the Beatty affair. He appreciates Peters' explanation of Smith's interests in the warrants and notes that he has avoided politics and public matters in his letters to Peters. 

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64

Vol 2, p. 121. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Mar. 11. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 36 cm. 

Description

Smith gives news of the various preachers and sermons given on the College's behalf. The distance and trouble in making arrangements for said sermons has left Smith with painful legs. 

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65

Vol 2, p. 122/123. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Apr. 24. ALS. 6 p. (3 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Smith reports that the Archbishop and Bishop of London are favorably disposed to Peters. Smith retained the subscription and the Governor's certificate but forwarded the rest of Peters' packet after learning the Bishop's views on the role of politicians in church affairs. The Bishop will approve Mr. Sturgeon's settlement but will give him a severe rebuke. Smith reviews, though supported by more personal reasons, his desire to have Peters wait until his return before setting out for England. These reasons range from professional to personal, such as the fear of Peters' possible death while at sea. He defends his position regarding his ongoing disagreements with Franklin. Smith writes disparagingly of Jay and his recent quest for knighthood. He tries to dispel rumors concerning Smith's own ambitions and hopes that Peters will come to his defense. Finally Smith defends Mr. Moore and rebukes Peters for judging too harshly. 

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66

Vol 2, p. 124. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Apr. 24. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Smith delivered the letters of the Trustees to Mr. Penn, Dr. Chandler, and the Archbishop. He will leave London in May and go on to York, Liverpool and from there to Ireland. He has been successful in the parishes of London. He has seventeen hundred pounds to the credit of the Trustees. There will be a benefit oration at which all will perform gratis. Smith has made assurances that money raised would be spent on salaries. 

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67

Vol 2, p. 125. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 Apr. 28. AL [draft]. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Assures Smith that things will work out in the end. Col. Armstrong's house burned with all his surveys, notes, and field books. Peters reports that Smith's land and warrants are in good order and his children healthy. There is much speculation over the appointment of a new governor and Smith's influence in this decision. 

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68

Vol 2, p. 126. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 Apr. 28. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Letter as above. 

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69

Vol 2, p. 127. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 May 6. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Thanks Smith for his influence with the Bishop on both Peter's account as well as that of Mr. Sturgeon. He will obtain orders from the trustees after they meet on Thursday but he expects they will take Smith's recommendations. Peters describes the damage received through Indian attacks. Peters remarks on Dr. Allison's jealousies and the problems with newspaper accounts regarding the College. 

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70

Vol 2, p. 128. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 May 21. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Six or seven parishes remain to be collected. Smith has been far more successful than Jay in raising money. Jay has tried in earnest but his manner and appearance are such that discourage contributions to the same scale as Smith's success. Jay is further disadvantaged by the fact that he is not a member of the clergy. Smith and Jay are keeping exact records where entries are made in each other's books and signed authenticating the entry. He concludes with brief and passing remarks regarding the political situation in England. 

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71

Vol 2, p. 129. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 May 27. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Thanks Smith on behalf of the trustees for his zealous efforts and success at fundraising. The trustees have sent addresses to the king and Lord Bute at Smith's request. The trustees are trusting Smith to his own discretion empowering him with greater authority on their behalf. 

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72

Vol 2, p. 130/132. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 May 28. ALS. 8 p. (4 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Peters has been in Newcastle settling the estate of Mr. Cookson so that Joseph Galloway might marry Hannah Cookson. The commencement brought many clergy and Peters talks of tutorships given various graduates. There has been a disagreement between the faculty and Mr. Francis Hopkinson. Robert Jones quit the Academy after a disagreement with Dr. Allison. Peters responds to Smith's difficulty in defending himself over the Beatty affair. Mr. Chew and Mr. Penn both spoke highly of Smith to Peters. Peters is discouraged as everyone is in a "scramble for wealth and power," but he finds the business of the Academy going well. Peters delivers news of social happenings in Philadelphia before closing this lengthy letter. 

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73

Vol 2, p. 133. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 June 1. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Thanking Smith for his support in his appointment to the Rectory, Peters pledges deep and abiding friendship. 

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74

Vol 2, p. 134. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 June 1. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Questions the actions taken regarding a directive to pay the Academy £500 as the consideration for the lot sold the church. This is the subscription of Mr. Penn, but clearly Mr. Peters sees difficulty in meeting the demand with three of the Society's five lawyers unavailable to form a majority. 

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75

Vol 2, p. 135. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 June 4. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith writes this letter in follow-up to his letter to the Trustees. He is eager to have his salary addressed for his return. His present salary of £250 is inadequate and he feels that £100 to £150 should easily be added. Opportunities have presented themselves in England and he hopes that something can be done to address his concerns over salary. 

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76

Vol 2, p. 136/137. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 June 4. ALS. 5 p. (3 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith has been too busy to meet with Mr. Lardner. Smith has traveled extensively preaching along the way and meeting increased success at fund raising. He expects to clear £4,000. Smith outlines some of the barriers he has faced in soliciting contributions including the fears of weak politicians apprehensive of a rival ship in arts or even "a state of Independency." 

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77

Vol 2, p. 138. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 June 4. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith sends the Archbishops full approbation of Peters' appointment. Smith has persuaded the clergy in England that a journey to England is not necessary for the appointment of clergy in the colonies but rather a letter of approbation enough. He asks that the Trustees pay a bond in his name to the heirs of Mr. Robeson. Smith will reimburse the College with interest upon his return. He still plans to go to Ireland and cannot determine when he will return to America. 

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78

Vol 2, p. 139. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 June 17. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 37 cm. 

Description

Smith received Peters' letter from April 28th and is touched by its affection. If it were not for Peters' support, and that of a few others, Smith would not have much incentive to return to Philadelphia which he describes as an unthankful place. Some are suspicious of the Brief gatherers but Smith is not apprehensive as all accounts will be published and therefore verifiable. Smith thinks he may set sail for America in August but it could very well be the following August. He seeks news from Peters on when the Trustees will conclude his mission successful and permit his return. Smith is anxious to avoid a dangerous winter journey having done this twice already. 

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79

Vol 2, p. 140. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 June 17. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 35 cm. 

Description

Smith succeeded, but with great difficulty, in obtaining a letter of approbation for Mr. Sturgeon. Mrs. Smith has been anxious about receiving Smith's warrants and papers from Peters and he asks that Peters deliver them. He assures Peters that he and Dr. Bond remain executors of his affairs but he hopes that Mrs. Smith's fears may be alleviated by this transfer. Smith asks also that Peters write Penn regarding a raise in salary for Smith. 

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Vol 2, p. 141. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 June 27. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Peters thinks the matter of whether to go to Ireland should be decided between Smith and Jay. The trustees are willing to leave Smith to his own direction. Peters has informed the clergy of Smith's role in gaining contributions from the clergy in England. He apologizes for the delay in sending an address of thanks to the king. Mr. Jonhanson has given notice and is leaving the schools. They have advertised for a new Mathematical Master. There is controversy over whether all Masters are to come from England and Dr. Allison has allowed his temper to flare on this issue. Peters advises Smith to be prudent in his dealings with Allison. 

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81

Vol 2, p. 142. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 June 28. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Mr. Barclay received £1,400 from Smith. All Briefs are being sent to Stafford where settlement will take place on the 14th of August. If a large sum of money is there, Smith will go straight on to New York without going to Ireland. He thinks it may be until the following spring where enough money will be made for his return. Again Smith reiterates the need for Peters to wait for Smith's return before leaving for England. Smith will visit with Peters' sister to assure her of the public good and request her patience. 

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82

Vol 2, p. 143. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Aug. 11. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Recounts sermons preached and money raised. He has eased the mind of Peters' sister and she is content to wait until next summer. Smith reports on Peters' family and friends. Smith presented the King's Address in person with several other College representatives. Smith will go to Ireland but because of the confusion in Ireland, Smith will confine his journey to Dublin, Cork, and a few trading towns. 

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83

Vol 2, p. 144. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Aug. 16. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Smith addresses Peters' concern over his sister and tells of issues surrounding the collection of funds. He has met with difficulty from William Meredith, Sr. Smith complains that Jay collected only £80-90 and became so caught up in the gaiety of Tunbridge that he did not make it to Salisbury and Bristol. Jay's effort, or lack of effort, and the sense that New York is wealthy, Smith feels, has hurt their cause. Smith concedes then that Jay does his best, particularly since his knighthood, but is hampered by his stuttering, fast speech, and lack of clerical connections. 

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84

Vol 2, p. 145/147. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Aug. 25. ALS. 11 p. (8 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Smith lists objections he has confronted in asking for contributions. The Archbishop has shared with Smith a letter of complaint against the College for its dominance by Scots Irish Presbyterians from the back woods. Smith is now adamant about Peters' remaining until his return. Advises Peters to dissuade John Penn from his friendship with Captain Pintard, a man with a terrible reputation. Smith has made arrangements for his passage. 

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85

Vol 2, p. 148. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Aug. 27. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Smith addresses the trouble with Dr. Allison over the passage published in the paper that states all Masters at Philadelphia and New York are to Masters of Arts from England. Smith and Jay followed up on such publications to dispel the rumors. They decided not to publish rebuttals because other American news stories more advantageous to their efforts, would soon be appearing in the papers. Nevertheless Smith gives a lengthy, logical defense against the accusation that he or Jay agreed to such a measure. 

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86

Vol 2, p. 149. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Aug. 27. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Smith discusses the distinctions between the money he has raised privately and that raised through the Briefs. The funds raised through the Briefs represent restricted gifts. Smith is concerned that he has not taken all the necessary steps with the Commissioners of these Briefs before lodging the money with Mr. Barclay and asks Peters' care in drawing on it. 

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87

Vol 2, p. 150. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Aug. 27. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Similar content almost verbatim of above letter regarding money left with Mr. Barclay. 

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88

Vol 2, p. 151. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Aug. 27. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Similar content almost verbatim of letter of same date regarding the English Masters controversy. 

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89

Vol 2, p. 152. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Sept. 12. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

£5,000 have already been paid on Brief. £2,000 has been deposited in the Bank of England until Smith is authorized to place it in the hands of Mr. Barclay. He is still resolved for returning in the October packet. Smith needs to know what money will be laid out for capital in order to satisfy the Commissioners. Smith recommends, against he is sure total consensus, that John Penn be appointed a Trustee at the next opening in recognition for all the assistance the Penn family has extended to the College. 

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90

Vol 2, p. 153. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Oct. 18. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 36 cm. 

Description

Smith hopes to take the first ship that leaves in March of 1764 as he is busy with fundraising for the College. He hopes that commencement will not be held until May so that he might return for it. Smith has stayed in Ireland for four weeks and received the assistance of Lord Primate Stone. They met with some delay by virtue of the fact that petitions needed to be made to Parliament. Smith remains cautiously optimistic and yet worries about anything dependent on public relief. He gives the situation in County Kilkenny in Ireland as example. In a postscript note written after dining with the Bishop of Waterford and others Smith notes that the disaster in Kilkenny almost prevents public aid to additional causes. 

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91

Vol 2, p. 154. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 Nov. 11. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Peters responds to fourteen letters he has received from Smith. Peters has found that because every letter contains both business and personal news he could not read one entire letter to the trustees and asks that in the future business letter be written to this end. Peters discusses the rate of exchanges due to silver prices. The trustees feel that Smith should have the College of Philadelphia's share be made payable to Smith and place this money in the hands of Mr. Barclay. Peters and the trustees would like to see Smith in Philadelphia by Christmas but ask that he be there by April at the latest. Peters expects to leave for England in May. Peters closes with comments on church politics. 

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92

Vol 2, p. 155. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 Nov. 12. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Peters outlines loans made as investments by the College. This level of detail is given to satisfy the King and his commissioners regarding the College's financial course and Smith's role as collector of funds. The letter closes with instructions to Smith to extend gratitude to Mr. Penn and all involved on the College's behalf. These thanks are also extended to Smith himself. 

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93

Vol 2, p. 156. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1763 Nov. 18. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Smith will write a letter to Mr. Stedman when he is certain that the letter is in safe hands as he has many private matters to discuss with him. In the meantime Peters should assure Stedman of Smith's gratitude for his friendship, loyalty and promotion of the College, and inspiration to the students. Smith asks Peters to deliver the enclosed "Women's book" to Mrs. Smith. 

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94

Vol 2, p. 157. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1763 Dec. 22. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Peters mentions Mr. Benjamin Wyncoop as a member of the Lower Assembly and of extremely good character. Peters is busy preparing for Christmas. He briefly mentions the relationship between the Trustees and the Faculty. Peters' health is suffering and he will remain in colonies until the beginning of May. In a postscript he comments on the French and Indians noting that the Indians are tired of the war. 

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95

Vol 2, p. 158. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1764 Feb. 7. AL [draft]. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Copy of a rough draft of a letter from Mr. Gibson to Mr. Barclay regarding funds raised and available to be drawn upon amounting to £3,800. 

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96

Vol 2, p. 159. Smith, William TO [Peters, Richard] 1764 Feb. 8. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Smith has been sick with a fever and retains nervous tremors in his hands. He has just arrived in Dublin and writes that he is alive and survived a terrible storm at sea. He is returning to England to attend to the College business there and reports that the College of New York and the College of Philadelphia shall clear between five and six thousand pounds each. Smith expects to return to Pennsylvania in June and directs Peters to prepare for commencement. 

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97

Vol 2, p. 160. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1764 Feb. 11. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Smith suffered from fever and became bedridden for ten weeks while in Dublin. He feels well served by providence in that every incident has worked to the College's advantage including the combining of efforts with New York. In retrospect Smith thinks that Philadelphia has received at least twice what it hoped to get on its own. Although mending, because of his illness, Smith remains in Ireland and will not risk travel until the Spring; he promises to be among his friends and family in May. The total share for the College of Philadelphia amounted to nearly £6,000 beyond expenses. He is disappointed in the lack of funds contributed by the Dissenters and notes that the Quakers have returned all their Briefs back blank. Smith closes hoping that the Trustees will put off commencement until his return in May. 

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98

Vol 2, p. 161. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1764 Feb. 14. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Letter outlining how the Trustees might draw for the money raised. Smith is leaving for America on the 22nd of March. In a "private letter" attached to his official letter, he notes that the Society will restore Mr. Sturgeon's salary. Pratt is to teach Writing and Mathematics. Mr. Willing would find Mathematics beneath him. 

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99

Vol 2, p. 162. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1764 Feb. 25. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Smith pushes to take voyage on Captain Walker's ship set to sail between the 10th and 20th of March. Smith again requests that Peters wait for his return. He thinks nothing will come of the charges against Mr. Duché, and would like to ignore the matter for the moment. He expands upon his ideas regarding Mr. Ewing and the teaching of Mathematics. 

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100

Vol 2, p. 163. Smith, William TO Peters, Richard 1764 Mar. 26. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

In the middle of next week he will sail from Liverpool in one of Mr. Hoops' ships. The reasons for the delay are outlined in a letter to Mrs. Smith but briefly Smith notes that he was obliged to stay another week to meet with Mr. Penn, the Archbishop and Dr. Chandler. If Walker remains long enough he will sail on his ship; either way Smith will leave next week. 

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101

Vol 2, p. 164. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1764 Aug. 25. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 18 cm. 

Description

Asking Smith to intercede in a small business transaction between W. Weyman to William Smith, Jr. 

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102

Vol 2, p. 165. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1765 Jan. 17. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 25 cm. 

Description

Peters is in England and writes Smith encouraging him to make religion and the attainment of heaven his principle occupation. He also advises Smith that the Proprietors are on their guard and advises Smith to keep out of view. Peters briefly discusses money lent out by the College on mortgages and sends his love to the Smith family. 

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103

Vol 2, p. 166. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1765 July 13. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Peters sends a letter of affection to Smith and his family. He pledges to do whatever possible to support him. 

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104

Vol 2, p. 167. Peters, Richard TO Smith, William 1765 Aug. 19. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Penn has recommended Smith's warranty of land; Penn has also approved Smith's other [unnamed] request. Peters will purchase gowns for Mr. Duché, and a wig for Smith. Peters has spoken to the Archbishop concerning their mission. 

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Original Volume Three 

Box

Folder

Vol 3, p. 1-2. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO [Smith, William] 1772 Mar. 4. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Poem of love and affection. 

2

106

Vol 3, p. 3. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Rebecca (Mrs.) 1775 June 6. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Inviting Mrs. Smith for a visit she offers to send her carriage after her during the week when her coachman will also be collecting Mr. Redman and Mr. Coxe. 

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107

Vol 3, p. 4. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William 1779 June 6. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Asking Smith for his advice and opinions regarding the settlement and sale of her deceased husband's estate. There are no claims on the estate yet she continues to experience difficulty in its sale. She will appeal to the Assembly and the Executive Council after hearing Smith's ideas. 

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108

Vol 3, p. 5/8. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William 1783 Sept. 3[1]. ALS. 14 p. (7 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

She writes to Smith of family, friends, and gives lengthy details concerning her legal troubles and those associated with the circumstance surrounding them including Mr. Stedman, Mr. Redman, Mr. Coxe, Mr. Bond. In this letter she refers to a letter written by her husband in July of 1783. 

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109

Vol 3, p. 9. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Rebecca (Mrs.) 1783 Oct. 16. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

Fergusson wishes Mrs. Smith to find out what she might about her situation regarding Mr. Fergusson and report back to her on what her impressions are. 

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110

Vol 3, p. 10. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William 1783 Apr. 1. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Rejoices in the restoration of the College and its appendages which, in her view, was unjustly detained. She is happy to see Smith in his present station and pleased on behalf of Mrs. Smith as well. 

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111

Vol 3, p. 11. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William 1789 Aug. 5. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Writes of visits, motherhood, and finding satisfaction from Mr. Bond regarding her ongoing difficulties. 

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112

Vol 3, p. 12. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William [1790] June 10. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

She writes what she feels ought to have been the proper attitude in regard to her friends defending her character and advising her openly and honestly about her husband. 

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Vol 3, p. 13. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William 1790 June 15. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

She sends him the Land of Cakes and concludes without much more news not wishing to write about herself. 

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114

Vol 3, p. 14. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William 1791 Jan. 6. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 cm. 

Description

With the death of Mr. and Mrs. Smith's daughter, Fergusson offers condolences. 

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115

Vol 3, p. 15. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William 1791 Jan. 6. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Fergusson expounds upon her previous letter of condolence on the death of their daughter. 

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Vol 3, p. 16. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William 1791 Jan. 6. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

She returns a letter which she described as "sovereign balsam to a wounded heart." She speaks of happening upon Mrs. Lydia M at the market and notes too that she visited with Mrs. Bond who is looking quite well. Promises to write in the future of the sorrowful death of Mrs. Fester who died at 26 and left 6 children. 

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Vol 3, p. 17-18. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William 1792 Apr. 10. ALS. 8 p. (16 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Fergusson continues to be troubled by her husband. She expects him to answer questions surrounding the pregnancy of a woman who claims he is the father. 

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Vol 3, p. 19. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William 1793 Nov. 8. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Letter of condolence on the death of Mrs. Smith. 

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119

Vol 3, p. 22. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William 1794 Sept. 13. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Talks still of the loss of Mrs. Smith and offers to return her letters of correspondence with Mrs. Smith should he so desire. 

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Vol 3, p. 23-24. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William n. d. ALS. 8 p. (4 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Reviewing the situation surrounding illegitimate children and recounting her heartache caused by her husband. 

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Vol 3, p. 25. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William 1794 Sept. 13; 1898 Feb. 20 copy. ALS copy. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 25 cm. 

Description

Letter regarding the character of a servant. 

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Vol 3, p. 26. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William [1781 June 10]. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Expresses gratitude to Smith and his brother Thomas for their assistance in the affair with the Assembly. She asks Smith's help in assisting Mr. Roberdeau move from Alexandria and obtain the position of Collector for which he is presently applying to the Assembly. She closes with personal sentiments on a number of friends that have died recently. 

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Vol 3, p. 27. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William [1785]. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Sends a copy of an affidavit taken of Mr. Fergusson. Included in the letter are condolences on the death of her mother. She has heard that Becky has been ill. 

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2

Vol 3, p. 28. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William [1791]. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 20 cm. 

Description

A copy of a letter from Caroline Goldsborough to Mrs. Cadwalader conveying the account of the death of Willamina Elizabeth, the daughter of Rebecca and William Smith. Mrs. Smith notes that it is a treasure. 

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3

Vol 3, p. 29-30. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William [1784] Feb. 3. ALS. 8 p. (4 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Laments that she has not received his most recent epistle and has nothing to inspire her narratives. On Sunday she visited Yellow Springs for rejuvenation. After sundown she passed the evening with his parents. She headed for the city and spent the night at the Bond's residence. The Stedmans also joined them. Fergusson recounts a lengthy tale regarding an exchange between a man named Harris and a woman named Jenny. She closes hoping that his son might count her among his friends and wishes that Smith will keep her letter for his eyes only and write her very soon. 

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Vol 3, p. 31. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William n. d. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

She returns a fan left by Miss Smith and is relieved to hear everyone is in improving health. 

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Vol 3, p. 32. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, Mrs. William [1792]. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

She refers to a poem signed Dorothy Plain which was published in The American Museum in February 1792. 

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Vol 3, p. 33-37. Fergusson, Elizabeth Graeme TO Smith, William 1795 June 7. ALS. 15 p. (8 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Frustrated from not hearing from him, Fergusson rites a lengthy letter outlining recent communications with a variety of current and former friends and associates. [Concluding page(s) missing.] 

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7

Vol 3, p. 47. Carroll, Charles; Carroll, Nicholas TO Smith, William 1789 Nov. 11. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Letter of thanks for Smith's services in delivering a discourse at the opening and dedication of St. John's College. They request a copy of his remarks for publication. 

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8

Vol 3, p. 50. Peters, Richard on behalf of Trustees TO Smith, William 1763 Jan. 11. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

The Trustees are pleased by Smith's solution to join forces with Dr. Jay as separate efforts might hurt them both. They encourage him to remain in England until the collection is fully completed and they thank him for his devotion to the cause. 

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9

Vol 3, p. 51. Rush, Benjamin TO Smith, William 1802 Jul. 20. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 25 cm. 

Description

Rush congratulates Smith for his vitality in old age. There is a reference to the recent death of Benjamin Franklin and great detail regarding Rush's proposals to [Charles Wilson] Peale and [Gilbert] Stuart that they create a gallery of portraits of sick people. Rush considered it safe to paint portraits of sick people since illnesses such as Yellow Fever were not contagious but spread only through the medium of the atmosphere. 

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Vol 3, p. 52. Smith, William TO Rush, Benjamin 1793 Oct. 22. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Mournful letter detailing the epidemic of Yellow Fever including the death of his wife. Smith gives an account of her deterioration and how he was assisted only by Richard Allen, a "worthy and pious Black," in placing her in her coffin. 

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Vol 3, p. 53. Rush, Benjamin TO Smith, William 1802 Jul. 20. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Rush was worried that he had lost the account of Mrs. Smith's death but found relief in the fact that Mrs. Rush had saved in among her personal papers knowing how important the subject matter was. Rush returned the 1793 letter after Smith made the request for it in 1802. 

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Vol 3, p. 54. Smith, William TO Rush, Benjamin n. d. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 18 cm. 

Description

Requests that Rush examine the enclosed sermons for its soundness of doctrine. Smith expects Rush to produce a considerable Jay subscription in Philadelphia; Mr. Moore has been assigned New York. 

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Vol 3, p. 55. Rush, Benjamin TO Smith, Rebecca (daughter) 1791 July 1. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

A letter to Rebecca, daughter of Rebecca and William Smith, shortly after her marriage. In it Rush advises her that the key to pleasing in company is to maintain good sense and a good nature. 

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Vol 3, p. 57-60. Smith, William TO Yeates, Jasper 1793 Oct. 22. ALS. 7 p. (4 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

A tearful letter recounting the death of Mrs. Smith, the attention from Dr. Rush and his other physicians, and the nursing done by Richard Allen. Smith expects to meet with the rest of his family in Norristown but must wait several days and take medication to prevent contagion. He asks Jasper Yeates to communicate with his family and instruct them to meet at Norristown. 

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15

Vol 3, p. 61. Yeates, Jasper TO Smith, William 1793 Oct. 26. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 25 cm. 

Description

Mournful letter over the loss of Mrs. Smith detailing the great pain suffered by all at the news. 

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Vol 3, p. 62. Nicolson, George Halyburton TO Smith, William 1778 June 28. Printed Circular. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

This circular announces the death of his aunt, Jean Halyburton, and requests his presence at her internment. 

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Vol 3, p. 63-64. Smith, William TO Smith, Rebecca (Mrs.) 1759 May 19. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Smith presented a civil memorial to the Attorney and Solicitor general about a month ago. They promised a report but have subsequently delayed in responding. The Archbishop and Rebecca's uncle have each intervened on Smith's behalf and still the report is not forthcoming. The Solicitor agreed that the proceedings of the Assembly were illegal, but there is still to be decided the recourse most effective to this problem. Smith must wait and cannot be specific as to his return until these questions are settled. He encourages her to go to Moorehall in the summer to escape the heat. 

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Vol 3, p. 65. Smith, William TO Smith, Rebecca (Mrs.) [1764 Apr. 19]. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 35 cm. 

Description

Smith, about to set sail and join his wife, writes down his instructions regarding his affairs relative to his work for the College so that these might be handled expeditiously should something happens to him in transit. His affairs in America are already attended to by those there. In addition he reports that Thomas Penn agreed to raise his salary by £100 to £150 per year. 

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Vol 3, p. 66. Smith, William TO Smith, Rebecca (Mrs.) 1772 Feb. 11. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Smith expects to depart by ship from South Carolina. He is disappointed not to be traveling by land, and writes a love letter to his wife in case the trip home results in his death. 

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20

Vol 3, p. 67. Barton, Thomas TO Smith, William 1774 Feb. 12. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 25 cm. 

Description

In this invitation to his daughter's wedding, Barton hopes that Smith will conduct the service and provided benediction. 

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21

Vol 3, p. 68. Smith, William TO Penn, Julianna 1776 Mar. 14. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Asks Lady Penn to make an apology to Mr. Baker for the delay in answering his letter. He promises an answer as soon as some progress has been made on the Connecticut dispute. 

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22

Vol 3, p. 69-70. Trustees by William Smith TO Washington, George 1789 June 27. ADS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 20 x 22 cm. 

Description

Draft of diploma awarded by the trustees to George Washington. 

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23

Vol 3, p. 71. Smith, William TO Bishop of London 1774 July. Copy. 11 p. (6 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Smith writes of the troubles in Boston after the tea party and notes that the conduct of Philadelphia remains orderly. Smith pledges support and loyalty to the Church and crown. Also included is the response from the Bishop of London urging Smith to do whatever he can to contribute to a return of peace and harmony between the colonies and the mother country. 

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Vol 3, p. 72. Sterling, James TO Smith, Rebecca (Mrs.) 1759 Feb. 12. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Sterling pledges Mrs. Smith support and comfort while William Smith is off in England defending himself. 

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Vol 3, p. 73. Clergy of Maryland TO Bishop of London 1783 Aug. 16. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Election of William Smith to the Office of Bishop made and signed unanimously at a general convention of Maryland. 

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26

Vol 3, p. 74. Trinity Church, Oxford 1795. AD. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Unsigned subscription of Trinity Church, Oxford requesting support for a minister. 

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27

Vol 3, p. 75. Longman, Mssr. n. d. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Extract of letter regarding their publishing of Franklin's pamphlet Plain Truth as mentioned in William Smith's eulogy of Franklin. 

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Vol 3, p. 76. Smith, Thomas TO Smith, William 1770 May 28. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Writes of the circumstance surrounding the surveying of William Smith's sizable holdings of Spring Grove lands and other plots, all of which are much nicer than anticipated. 

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Vol 3, p. 77-78. Smith, William 1758 Nov. 27. ADS. 7 p. (4 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Codicil to will covering in full his wishes regarding his papers and recent publications. He hastily wrote this codicil in New Jersey as he departed for England to make his defense before the King against the charges of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania. This was revoked by a later will. 

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Vol 3, p. 79. Smith, William 1793 Oct. 1. ADS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 26 cm. 

Description

Extracts from first codicil to will instructing that a monument be placed at the grave of his son, Thomas Duncan Smith, and at the grave of his wife. His wife's tombstone should be large enough to cover the ground for her grave as well as his. He includes expectations around the inscription. He leaves a lot of land in Huntington to Willamina Smith, the daughter of his brother Thomas, his wife Letitia. Regarding his writings he expects his letter to Benjamin Rush be followed as his will. This codicil was revoked July of 1802 and contains additional comments written February 1803. 

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Vol 3, p. 80. Smith, Charles TO Smith, William 1765 Feb. 7. ADS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 33 cm. 

Description

Power of Attorney to receive money due him from Captain Joseph Hopkins. Witnessed by Joseph Hodges and William Gilbert. 

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Vol 3, p. 81. Smith, William 1800 Mar. 23. ADS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 19 cm. 

Description

End page of document noting that the contents included a draft of a will drawn up during his serious illness in 1800. [Contents detached and missing.] 

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Vol 3, p. 87. Smith, Rebecca (Mrs. William) TO Smith, Charles 1784 Nov. 8. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

Thanking Charles for the butter, a commodity difficult to procure in town. Reports that Molly Tilghman has recovered from the severe illness which many thought would result in her death. Her letter is filled with news of family and friends including wedding hopes and regards from Black Dinah. 

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Vol 3, p. 88. Smith, Rebecca (Mrs. William) TO Smith, Charles 1785 Feb. 20. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Illness and fever consumed his sister Becky for some time until at last she was able to sit up. Unfortunately her friend Mrs. Gordon as well as her mother were not as fortunate and died. Mrs. Smith grieves their loss heavily. Expresses delight in the beauty of her granddaughters but hopes Charles will have sons in the future. 

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Vol 3, p. 89. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Oct. 6. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 34 cm. 

Description

Reports from Carlisle on his military expedition filled with his views on government and details of military life. 

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Vol 3, p. 90. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary [1794]. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 24 cm. 

Description

The march to Parkinson's Ferry, "the seat of Sedition," is progressing in spite of the wet weather. His health and appetite remain steady. 

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Vol 3, p. 91. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Oct. 20. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Now in Bedford, Charles anticipates the Army tour taking him to all corners of Pennsylvania with the exception of Lake Erie. He expects to return home in November and writes with eager anticipation and love. 

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38

Vol 3, p. 95. Smith, William TO Maskelyne, Nevil [1769] n. d. AL [incomplete]. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 26 cm. 

Description

Smith thanks Maskelyne for his part in making the viewing of the transit of Venus possible. He has sent an account to Mr. Penn and refers Maskelyne to Penn for said accounts. Smith worries whether these papers arrived safely and has not yet heard from Penn. As a result he gives an overview with the hope that greater detail may be gained in the near future. 

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Vol 3, p. 96. Penn, Thomas TO Smith, William 1768 June 3. AL [incomplete]. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Brief note about tracking the movement of planets in the night sky. 

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40

Vol 3, p. 97. Smith, William TO Penn, Thomas 1769 June 8. LS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Gratefully acknowledges the Reflecting Telescope that Penn donated to the College; the telescope allowed for the observation of the transit of Venus which was deemed a priority by all learned men including those connected with the American Philosophical Society and the Library Company. Smith details the observations and the role played by Rev. Mr. Ewing, Joseph Shippen, Esq., Provincial Secy., Dr. Williamson, Mr. Prior, Mr. Thomason, Mr. Owen Biddle, John Lukens, David Rittenhouse, and John Sellers. 

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Vol 3, p. 98. Penn, Thomas; Maskelyne, Nevil TO Smith, William 1769 Sept. 14; 1769 Aug. 2. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Extract of September 14, 1769 letter from Maskelyne to Thomas Penn thanking him for the account of the Pennsylvania observations of the transit of Venus. He hopes to compare these with observations made in England and Europe. He asks for clarification of latitude and longitude so that his own observations and conclusions may be more comprehensive. Penn requests information from Smith on September 14, 1769. 

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Vol 3, p. 99. Maskelyne, Nevil TO Smith, William 1769 Dec. 26. AL. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 32 cm. 

Description

Thanking Smith for the account of the valuable observations on the transit of Venus. He will have them printed and goes on to ask more specific questions about the observations and who beyond David Rittenhouse conducted them. Maskelyne sent Penn his observations on the eclipses of Juniper's first satellite. 

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Vol 3, p. 101. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Oct. 30. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 30 cm. 

Description

Their march to Salt Lick in Fayette County met with great amounts of rain making their travel very difficult. 

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Vol 3, p. 102. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Oct. 26. LS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 24 cm. 

Description

Writes of poor weather conditions and the toll this has taken on their uniforms and boots. His spirits remain positive and he continues to believe he will return in November. 

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Vol 3, p. 103. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Nov. 1. LS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 26 cm. 

Description

The army is making progress in capturing and dispersing the rioters. He remains well in spite of continued inclement weather. 

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Vol 3, p. 104. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Nov. 3. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Still in Westmoreland, the Army continues to struggle against terrible weather conditions. These difficulties have forced an extension of their mission to the beginning of December. 

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Vol 3, p. 105. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Nov. 6. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 cm. 

Description

His good health remains uninterrupted. He lists a range of meals he has cooked for the troops and takes pleasure with his success in this department. He continues targets his return to early December. 

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Vol 3, p. 106. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Nov. 8. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Now at the forks of the Yough near Petersons, Charles writes enthusiastically about the countryside and its inhabitants. The weather has broken and they have set a nice camp. His love for wife and son thread this letter as in those past. 

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Vol 3, p. 107. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Nov. 12. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Charles arrived in Pittsburgh to visit with friends and family. He writes that without the two rivers the city would be a "dismal hole." His social engagements remind him of his loneliness for his own wife, son, and home. 

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Vol 3, p. 108. Smith, Charles TO Smith, Mary (Mrs.) 1794 Nov. 13. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 20 cm. 

Description

Progress has been made in arresting the insurgents. He expects to return at the beginning of December and asks Mary to obtain beef, turkey, duck, and geese so that he might prepare meals for several gentlemen with whom he has made his acquaintance during the tour. 

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Vol 3, p. 109. Smith, William TO Smith, Charles 1794 Dec. 10. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 34 cm. 

Description

Advises Charles that Mr. Nicholson agreed to comply with his request concerning cash notes payable in three and ten months. Smith sold 200 acres of his own Lower Merion farm to Nicholson as well. 

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Vol 3, p. 110. Goldsborough, Charles TO Smith, William 1802 Sept. 9. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 36 cm. 

Description

Conveying the particulars around his daughter's illness and death including her sentiments for her father. 

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Vol 3, p. 111. Smith, William TO Smith, Charles 1802 Feb. 17. ALS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

William is weak and expects to live only a short while longer. He writes of his love for his family and will forward instructions to Charles regarding his sole management of his Huntington affairs. 

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Vol 3, p. 112. Smith, William TO Smith, Charles and Richard 1803 Mar. 21. ALS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 28 cm. 

Description

Power of attorney to Charles for the management of his estate in Huntington. He asks Thomas to deliver all inventories and books relative to the Huntington properties to Charles and expects Thomas to care for issues attendant to the heirs of Fisher and Carmick, Mrs. Bond (his aunt), and Mr. Vickroy. 

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Vol 3, p. 113. Smith, William Wemyss TO Smith, Richard 1818 Apr. 6. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 25 cm. 

Description

Gives instructions on the careful bookbinding he wishes to have done. 

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Vol 3, p. 114. Smith, Richard TO Smith, Richard Penn 1822 July 19. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

Inquiring as to whether Richard Penn Smith will assist William satisfy his debt to the bank through the sale of land at Oswego. William's professional reputation is at stake. 

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Vol 3, p. 115. Blodget, John A. TO Smith, Charles 1829 Feb. 8. ALS. 3 p. (2 leaves) ; 26 cm. 

Description

Request information on his mother's land in Huntington County as he is quite certain Charles, the executor of William's estate and therefore keeper of the paper records, will be able to answer his questions. Blodget's mother has assigned to him power of attorney. 

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Vol 3, p. 116. Smith, Thomas TO Smith, Charles 1808 July 28. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 25 cm. 

Description

Thomas instructs Charles to take action on the issue surrounding the support of Mrs. Blodget (their sister) who hastily relocated to New York with her children, placed the eldest in the British Navy and opened a boarding house. Thomas assumes that she is insane as is her husband, but hopes that he and Charles will do all that is right as her brothers. 

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Vol 3, p. 117. Smith, Charles TO Blodget, John A. 1829 Mar. 8. ALS. 4 p. (2 leaves) ; 25 cm. 

Description

Charles makes a lengthy defense on his management of the Smith estate and reviews the responsibilities of each of the heirs regarding land and taxes. He reacts to his sister's letter with great disappointment but is grateful that she has appointed John her attorney and that he will work at partitioning her remaining lands. 

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Vol 3, p. 118. Blodget, Mrs. TO Smith, Charles 1829 [Feb. 8]. ALS. 2 p. (2 leaves) ; 25 cm. 

Description

Charles' sister introduces John's letter and requests that Charles turn over all necessary papers to John in the settlement of her affairs. She is unhappy with Charles' management and views this letter as a final communication. 

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Vol 3, p. 120. Smith, William n. d. AD. 2 p. (2 leaf) ; 31 cm. 

Description

Draft of Codicil to will covering lands and mansion house at the Falls of the Schuylkill as well as lands in Huntington County. 

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Original Volume Five 

Box

Folder

Vol and p. unknown. Smith, M.; Smith, Willamina TO Kimball, Sarah 1836 Jun. 21. ALS. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 23 cm. 

Description

Mrs. Smith reveals her disappointment that Sarah has not joined her at Belmont for strawberries and cream. She is certain it will improve Sarah's health as it did her own. A second letter to Willamina hopes Sarah might be talked into coming out for a rest and discusses clothing, household issues, relations, and the potential marriage of Harriet Clarkson. 

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Vol 5, p. 1. Shipley, John 1765 June. Pamphlet. 12 p. (6 leaves) ; 

Description

A Sermon Preached at the Grand Sessions in June 1764 Before the Honorable Thomas Clarke, Esq., Chief Justice. Barbados: Printed by George Esmand and Company. 

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Vol 5, p. 2. Smith, William TO Reed, Joseph 1779 Mar. 17. Published letter. 16 Pieces 

Description

A letter to Joseph Reed published in the Pennsylvania Gazette regarding his sermons in defense of liberty. 

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Vol 5, p. 3. Smith, William 1786. Pamphlet. 8 p. (4 leaves) ; 

Description

Draught of a Plan of Education for the Wilmington Academy. Wilmington: Printed by James Adams. 

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66

Vol 5, p. 4. Bryan, George 1788. Clippings. 8 Pieces 

Description

"George Bryan's Anti-federal Lying Letters" as published in the Pennsylvania Gazette. 

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67

Vol 5, p. 5. Smith, William 1762 Nov. 6. Clippings. 4 Pieces 

Description

Address to Newcastle on behalf of the College published in the Newcastle Courant. 

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68

Vol 5, p. 6. Delaware and Schuylkill Navigation Company 1796. Clippings. 9 Pieces 

Description

Lotteries, resolutions, and list of payments for funds relative to raising money for the Delaware and Schuylkill Navigation Company and the Schuylkill and Susquehanna Navigation Company. 

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Vol 5, p. 7. Haller, John Frederick 1804 June 5. Pamphlet. 30 p. (15 leaves) ; 22 cm. 

Description

Strictures on the Proceedings of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania of 1803-1804: Relating to the State Judiciary Trial By Jury and One of the Judges of the Supreme Court presented by the author to Charles Smith. Philadelphia: Printed for the Author. 

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Original Volume Six 

Box

Folder

Vol 6, p. 1. Smith, William [1753]. AD. 7 p. (4 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

List of papers by William Smith to be collected and other papers connected therewith. 

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Vol 6, p. 2. Smith, William 1752. AD. 6 p. (3 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

Manuscript of his first article published in the American press entitled: "On the Liberty of Press." 

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Vol 6, p. 3. Smith, William [1871]. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Title page stating "Various Letters, Poems, etc. Fragments etc. found among the papers of Wm. Smith D.D. some if not all are worthy of publication" H.W.S. This page refers to descriptions which follow. 

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Vol 6, p. 4. Duché, Jacob 1756. AD. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 20 x 9 cm. 

Description

"Ode to Rev. Smith," an unfinished poem of high esteem for his mentor. 

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Vol 6, p. 5-6. Delancy, Mrs. Phila TO Smith, William 1752 Nov. 15. AD. 24 p. (12 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Transcription of Phila Delancy's letter to William Smith shortly after her husband set off for England having learned that his brother had died. She comments on a woman's intellectual abilities. Smith's response is included; he sends her an American pastoral. 

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Vol 6, p. 7. Smith, William [1752]. AD. [bound with above] 

Description

"An essay to fix the idea of an American Pastoral." 

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Vol 6, p. 8. Delancy, Mrs. Phila TO Smith, William 1753 Apr. 11. AD. [bound with above] 

Description

She sends a few lines attempting to achieve the design of his previous address. She knows "he will not expect much from [her]." 

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Vol 6, p. 9. Delaney, Mrs. Phila TO Smith, William 1753 Apr. 11. AD. [bound with above] 

Description

She sends the few lines referred to in her letter, "Extempore Verses, on a Breach of Promise" for his review. 

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Vol 6, p. 10. Smith, William 1752 Aug. AD. 7 p. (4 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Epitaph to Miss Philips entitled, "On a young Lady deceased." 

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76

Vol 6, p. 11. Smith, William n. d. AD. [bound with above] 

Description

"To Amanda Extempore: The Lady to Whom I was Soon Afterward Happily Married On Being Unable to Write Upon Divine Subjects." 

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76

Vol 6, p. 12. Smith, William 1758. AD. [bound with above] 

Description

Poem entitled, "To Eudocia" 

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76

Vol 6, p. 13. Smith, William n. d. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 20 cm. 

Description

"The Songs of Selma" 

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77

Vol 6, p. 14. Smith, William n. d. AD. 2 p. (1 leaf) ; 19 cm. 

Description

"A Dialogue between..." 

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78

Vol 6, p. 16. Smith, William n. d. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 18 x 7 cm. 

Description

Printed "Hymn to Charity" on the benefit of the Relief of the Widows and Children of Clergymen in Communion with the Church of England. 

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79

Vol 6, p. 17. Smith, William or Rebecca n. d. AD. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 19 cm. 

Description

Ode [to Benjamin Franklin]. 

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80

Vol 6, p. 18. W. C. TO Sterling, James 1748 Sept. 21. ADS. 1 p. (1 leaf) ; 33 cm. 

Description

"To The Revd. Mr. James Sterling on reading his Poem of Hero and Leander, and Drama entitled the Rival Generals" 

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81

Vol 6, p. 19. Sterling, James TO Smith, William 1748 Apr. 4. ADS. 1 p. (2 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Poem by James Sterling to Smith in jail. 

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82

Vol 6, p. 20. Smith, William 1754 - 1755. ADS. 92 p. (25 leaves) ; 21 cm. 

Description

Bound volume entitled "German Free Schools" containing minutes, correspondence and lists relating to the Society for the Propagating Christian Knowledge Among the Germans Settled in Pennsylvania, commonly known as the German Free School movement to establish these schools throughout Pennsylvania. 

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83

Vol 6, p. 21. Smith, William 1762 Nov. 1 - Dec. 19. AD. 11 p. (8 leaves) ; 17 cm. 

Description

Diary account of his fundraising activities on behalf of the College. 

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1

Vol 6, p. 22-26. Smith, William TO Tucker, Dr.; Bishop of London 1765 Dec. 18; 1774 July. AD. 26 p. (16 leaves) ; 19 cm. 

Description

Letters to Dean Tucker and to the Bishop of London on the political activities leading to the American Revolution. To Tucker Smith writes on the Stamp Act and to the Bishop on the recent events throughout the American colonies. 

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2

Vol 6, p. 27. Smith, William 1766 May 20. AD. 36 p. (20 leaves) ; 19 cm. 

Description

Manuscript notes on commencement exercises. 

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3

Vol 6, p. 28. Smith, William 1767. AD. 20 p. (10 leaves) ; 18 cm. 

Description

Manuscript notes on commencement exercises. 

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4

Vol 6, p. 29. Smith, William 1768 Nov. 29. AD. 6 p. (5 leaves) ; 19 cm. 

Description

Manuscript notes on commencement exercises. 

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5

Vol 6, p. 30. Smith, William 1775. ADS. 40 p. (21 leaves) ; 20 cm. 

Description

Memorandum book of notes, extracts, letters, and sermons on religion and politics kept for reference particularly for future publications. 

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6

Vol 6, p. 31. Smith, William n. d. AD. 32 p. (24 leaves) ; 26 cm. 

Description

Manuscript notes for Smith's lectures on unrestricted commerce and notes on Adam Smith's political economy. 

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Original Volumes One to Six 

Box

Folder

Original Table of Contents to bound volumes. 

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William Smith Papers Microfilm 

Box

Folder

Volume 1 - Volume 3, p. 71. 

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Volume 3, p. 72 to end - Volume 5, Volume 6. 

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